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Cummins aims to put new 5.0L diesel in more market segments


kscarbel
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Fleet Owner / October 3, 2013

Cummins today unveiled its new ISV5.0, a new 5-liter V8 diesel that extends the engine maker’s range to cover various North American commercial light- and medium-duty vehicle applications, up through Class 5 GVW ratings, with a powerplant that the company said is engineered to “deliver performance and a low total cost of ownership”.

The engine will soon be available as an option in the Nissan Titan and Toyota Tundra.

Cummins said the ISV5.0 will be aimed at customers in the U.S. and Canada and will be certified to the near-zero NOx and PM emissions levels required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

At launch— slated for the fourth quarter of next year— the engine will also meet federal greenhouse gas (GHG) requirements through 2016 as well as 2015 Air Resources Board (ARB) standards, including on-board diagnostics.

Applications for the new engine will include step vans and medium-duty trucks as well as school buses and Class A RVs that had typically been spec’ed with gasoline-fueled engines.

“Cummins ISV5.0 creates new opportunities for our OEM customers as a compact and lightweight engine that delivers best-in-class fuel efficiency and total cost of ownership,” stated Dave Crompton, vice president and general manager - Engine Business.

“Many of our OEM customers have asked for a Cummins alternative for gasoline or other small-displacement automotive diesel engines,” he continued. “The ISV5.0 represents the next dimension in fuel economy and performance as Cummins continues to broaden our on-highway product line.”

Crompton said the engine has been designed to easily fit where a comparable V8 or V10 gasoline engine was previously installed.

He explained that multiple front-end accessory drive options handle the common automotive accessories required by a wide spectrum of applications, including the alternator, air compressor, A/C compressor and hydraulic pump. Crompton noted that these available options “coupled with Cummins integration expertise minimize OEM engineering time and vehicle retooling costs. Together, the OEM and Cummins complete a rigorous installation quality assessment, ensuring that the highest-quality product is delivered to our mutual customers.”

A key design goal for the ISV5.0 was to deliver “maximum durability in a lightweight package” as well as to ensure “excellent” excellent noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) characteristics.

To provide that durability, the engine boasts a compacted graphite iron (CGI) cylinder block, forged steel crankshaft, high-strength aluminum alloy heads and composite valve covers. Per Cummins, those features along with dual overhead camshaft, contribute to the engine’s MVH performance.

Crompton also pointed out that high-injection pressures from the latest Bosch High Pressure Common Rail (HPCR) fuel system and piezo fuel injectors provide precise fuel control for optimized in-cylinder combustion. He said that leads to better fuel efficiency and reduced emissions.

With multiple injection events driven by integrated electronic controls, the HPCR fuel system along with the Cummins VGT Variable Geometry Turbocharger “contributes to a very impressive peak torque of 560 lb-ft and quick throttle response. Ratings from 200 to 275 horsepower will be available.

“This engine delivers torque where you live vs. what is capable from a gasoline engine,” pointed out Mike Taylor, director—custom engineering. “The result is lower engine speeds, which males driving less tiring and more productive for the operator. And the ISV5.0 provides a lower total cost of ownership due to its better fuel efficiency versus a gasoline engine and its expected higher resale value.”

Other key features of the ISV5.0 include:

  • An advanced ceramic glow plug system for us in cold weather that significantly reduces start time and electrical current draw, reducing vehicle charging system requirements. The ceramic glow plugs are designed to last the life of the engine, with no maintenance.
  • A two-stage fuel filter system that features the latest NanoNet media from Cummins Filtration to ensure that the HPCR fuel system is fully protected against fuel contamination. NanoNet's unique construction provides lower fuel-flow restriction and traps greater than 99% of all particles as small as 4 microns.
  • A high-efficiency coalescing filter for eliminating crankcase hydrocarbon emissions and oil mist, further adding to the clean-engine credentials of the ISV5.0.
  • Proven air handling and emissions control technology that draws on Cummins extensive emissions technology expertise. Cummins VGT Turbocharger, cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) and Cummins Emission Solutions Aftertreatment System, featuring a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), result in near-zero oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while delivering better performance and fuel economy.

“Cummins has integrated the latest technologies in the ISV5.0 to deliver performance, fuel efficiency and durability in a highly sociable package,” remarkedJim Katzenmeyer, executive engineer – V8 Program. “Every day, drivers will appreciate the smooth, quiet operation of the ISV5.0

“In addition,” he continued, “the fuel savings offered by the ISV5.0 compared to gasoline engines will result in fewer greenhouse gas emissions– a great environmental benefit.”

“The support of this engine will easily be integrated into Cummins distributors and authorized dealer shops, and into customer operations with fleets that are running the broad range of dependable Cummins power,” noted Jeff Jones, vice president - North American Engine Business.

As for the sales outlook on an engine that will enter production roughly a year from now, Jeff Caldwell, general manager - Pickup Truck Business, told FleetOwner that he “expects that OEMs will all dip a toe in this [the ISV5.0} to offer it. We know that with is engine, we’ll deliver a lower installed cost for OEMs and a lower total cost of ownership compared to gasoline engines as well as better NVH performance. And that NVH factor is a big benefit—this engine is quite, a real whisperer.”

The ISV5.0 will be manufactured at Cummins’ Columbus, Indiana engine plant.

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What is Ram thinking by not picking up exclusive rights to this engine?

ram is putting the italian designed small diesel engine in there half ton trucks. probably already had it planned before this new cummins came out. or fiat wanted there own engine in the ram ?

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you would think gm would buy this engine for its new half tons. it seems wierd that toyota and nissan are gonna have the same engine . i still think gas is the best for light duty trucks the diesels cost so much more than a gas job and diesel fuel is more expensive than gas and the added cost of the def makes the gas engine look better to me. i mean how much weigh does a half ton truck usually haul?

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you would think gm would buy this engine for its new half tons. it seems wierd that toyota and nissan are gonna have the same engine . i still think gas is the best for light duty trucks the diesels cost so much more than a gas job and diesel fuel is more expensive than gas and the added cost of the def makes the gas engine look better to me. i mean how much weigh does a half ton truck usually haul?

True, Diesel is higher, and DEF is an added cost, however, the fuel mileage with a trailer is double with the diesel, the service intervals are longer, there are no spark plugs or coil packs to change and the engine is designed to last two to three times as long as the gas engine. I had a Duramax in my 2002 CHevy 2500HD, was a crew cab short bed 4x4, I had 318,000mi on it when I traded it in in july of 2011 and never did anything to the engine, I had to rebuild all the hubs, the power steering, replace the shocks, alternator, pretty much everything but the engine and the Allison transmission. If GM offered a small Diesel for the half ton trucks I weould trade mine tomorrow to get it, I actually was already on board to get the 6 cylinder Duramax they designed in 2002/2003 but they scrapped the project after the emissions rules got so damn screwy.

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IMO this sounds like a bad idea. Volume is king-who is going to buy this for their half tons? Not Ford, Not GM and as someone noted, Dodge will if anything be relying more and more on their Italian connection. This guy Marchione is no dope. He will do whtever he can to boost utilization within the Chrysler/Fiat family. And as for Cummins and Dodge, I say the only reason Dodge sells as well as they do is many people want no part of a V-8 Power Stroke or Duramax and like the 6.7 Cummins.

If they are counting on Toyota/Nissan to build volume, forget it. I would bet Ford probably sells more light duty trucks in a month than Nissan and Toyota combined sell in a year. Oh and Ford if they ever do decide that a diesel makes sense in a 150, will have their own 5 cylinder diesel.

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I realize that Fiat owns 50 percent of Italy's VM Motori. (The new DOHC intercooled VGT 2.0-liter diesel engine offering in the 2014 Chevrolet Cruze delivering 46 mpg highway was designed by VM Motori although it's produced by GM/Daewoo in South Korea. But ironically, GM now plans to sell their half to Fiat, giving the Italians full ownership)

But I think Fiat's Sergio Marchionne is making a mistake here. The VM Motori engine, while fine for future Jeep brand products, is not going to promote pickup truck sales like a Cummins engine would. In the American pickup segment, and particularly at Dodge owing to the history, it has to be Cummins. That name speaks volumes to would-be buyers. And of course, Cummins is the only diesel in the US pickup segment with a stellar track record.

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I realize that Fiat owns 50 percent of Italy's VM Motori. (Ironically, General Motors owns the other half but Americans have not seen any fruit from the joint venture. And now GM plans to sell their half to Fiat, giving the Italians full ownership)

But I think Fiat's Sergio Marchionne is making a mistake here. The VM Motori engine, while fine for future Jeep brand products, is not going to promote pickup truck sales like a Cummins engine would. In the American pickup segment, and particularly at Dodge owing to the history, it has to be Cummins. That name speaks volumes to would-be buyers. And of course, Cummins is the only diesel in the US pickup segment with a stellar track record.

I guess in my lifetime I paid too many bills for Cummins-V-185's V-210'S and Triple Nickels :rolleyes: And like I said, only reeason dodge sells vs ford or GM is the 6.7.

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