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Glove Box Exterior And Latch


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Last night I installed the latch catch with two screws and it still will not catch the lid. I'm wondering if someone had drilled two holes above where metal once was and tried to fix the lid door so it would not fall down? My hopes are for someone to post a photo of their glove box for me to see if I need to cover the area with a piece of metal and drop down and drill two holes lower than the ones you see here?

Your help needed!

Thanks mike

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Mike , Ill take some pictures of mine in a few. Mine has a new latch and all but still wont stay shut , a bump in the road and it slowly pops open.

Thanks Jay,

My lid was stuffed with duct tape for a get me by. I took my g/f for a ride this past week and the lid fell open and luckly her legs were not hit by the lid but came close. So I decided to fix it until I got ready to paint the interior. I've adjusted the lid side to side and up but, it does not fit as it should to cover up the screws at the top that hold the latch.

Again Thanks

mike

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Cut the damage out, weld some new sheet metal into the area drill and file to perfection. This is a common problem with this setup and the reason a lot of the trucks are missing the door completly.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Cut the damage out, weld some new sheet metal into the area drill and file to perfection. This is a common problem with this setup and the reason a lot of the trucks are missing the door completly.

Rob

Rob, that is what was in the back of my thoughts but hoped I would not have to weld in this close area and also has a curved lip where these screws are so high up near this curved area that they show up like a sore thumb even when the door is shut. I'll do it right even if it takes me awhile.

mike

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Rob, that is what was in the back of my thoughts but hoped I would not have to weld in this close area and also has a curved lip where these screws are so high up near this curved area that they show up like a sore thumb even when the door is shut. I'll do it right even if it takes me awhile.

mike

Get you a copper back up plate and clamp it to the backside. Plug weld up the original screw holes, then "noodle" weld additional metal to the lower part of the opening and file off the excess till proper fitment is achieved for the latch. Not too difficult to do really but may take some practice if not used to welding on such thin stock.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Hey mike,i have done this job myself on a friends B-61, i don't know what your welding capacity/availability is, but this is a pretty straight-forward repair. I used a MIG welder with an angled tip holder,i formed a new piece of sheet metal to mimmic the piece i cut out and it worked like a champ! but, as Rob said, use caution when welding on this thin a metal,its REAL easy to get too hot and burn right through it! (don't ask me how i know that!)..........Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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Hey mike,i have done this job myself on a friends B-61, i don't know what your welding capacity/availability is, but this is a pretty straight-forward repair. I used a MIG welder with an angled tip holder,i formed a new piece of sheet metal to mimmic the piece i cut out and it worked like a champ! but, as Rob said, use caution when welding on this thin a metal,its REAL easy to get too hot and burn right through it! (don't ask me how i know that!)..........Mark

Mark,

My welding skills are %*@<^ tried 2 years ago to go at night after work to one of the closest comprehensive schools only to find it was for younger guys & dolls that were making a career out of welding. This is a big let down for me and probably others. Schools have drasticly changed since I last went. My last course was motorcycle mechanics back in 1975. So i'm screwed and feel it more often each year.

I'll fix it and will look right....can't have it any other way. My machine shop near my home has made excuse after excuse, I think it's because I don't bring them large enough business. Man.... America has changed. I had my air tank welded at another place and you should see what a glob of metal they applied during my only visit. I'll post it.

mike

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Yeah, i hear what you're saying! i'm pretty much self taught (arc welding) but i did go to school for mig/tig classes,just takes a LOT of practice! don't give up on it though, you're never too old to learn something new! welding can be a great asset in the old truck hobby, schools can provide you with the basics, but you really need to find a good welder around you to "shade" for awhile till you get your technique down, MOST older hands are more then happy to help you along,provided you are serious about learning......as far as that "patch" job on your air tank, i sure hope they did'nt charge you for that!.....i could'nt sleep at night knowing i did a job like that, even for free!..........Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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Last night I installed the latch catch with two screws and it still will not catch the lid. I'm wondering if someone had drilled two holes above where metal once was and tried to fix the lid door so it would not fall down? My hopes are for someone to post a photo of their glove box for me to see if I need to cover the area with a piece of metal and drop down and drill two holes lower than the ones you see here?

Your help needed!

Thanks mike

mike - here is couple of pics of mine. aj

post-3642-053740700 1278259289_thumb.jpg

post-3642-034978900 1278259313_thumb.jpg

post-3642-023411400 1278259329_thumb.jpg

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  • 2 months later...

hi mike

i see you said in another post that you had been working on your glovebox. i posted a couple of pics for you and always wondered if you had finished your repair. aj

Sorry AJ,

I've been slacking. I stopped inside work and am taking the truck apart starting frontend first. If I can catch the little girl next door, i'll see if she can help me get the hood off. I can handle the rest after that.

Very good photo's of your glove box and I appreciate very much, you showing it. The holes on my glove box look to me too high up near the curve of the dash. So i'll weld those shut and make new holes the same size, but lower toward the opening.

mike

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A bit of help:

Use .023 wire in a wire feed welder (gas shielded) and if you have a feed guide somewhere, set the feed at just under the gage of the dash metal.

Packer

Hi Packer,

You must have been busy, haven't heard from ya in a while. Thats some good advise. I have not seen the size you suggested the .023 only the .025 & .030 etc. When using the gas, what percentage and which gas? Does the gas help with splatter and heat? I know that the thin metals need less heat. :thumb:

Had to think about the feed a few minutes,but I got it now.

Many Thanks!

mike

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