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Air Compressor


chrisco302
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thats what i thought how hard are they to swap out ?

Not bad on an R model. Coolant in and out, oil in, air out line for plumbing. There are three bolts and the one at the upper inside next to the block will require a long extension to reach. Use a new phenolic coupler when you reinstall the reman unit.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Rob how bout a B67? Not so easy i guess. glenn

I haven't done it yet. I do think with the doghouse off in the cab I may be able to wiggle in there with a long extension and a wobble socket. I don't think it will be anyway near easy though!!

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Compressor replacements on DM600's kinda suck too!

.

I'd never thought about that before but can see it being difficult with the cab shifted.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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it looks simple i guess there are no tricks to it just wasnt sure how the shaft hooks up do you just slide it out and back in there is nothing i can mess up is there ?

Forgot to mention earlier if you have power steering the pump could be mounted to the rear of the compressor so the lines would need removed also.

The compressor has a metal gear for the drive with several teeth. The phenolic coupling that fastens to the auxilary shaft has corresponding teeth. I don't remember them being timed but are rather a slip fit. The compressor will slide right up to the mating surface if the teeth engage. Don't force it going back together, it's not needed.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Forgot to mention earlier if you have power steering the pump could be mounted to the rear of the compressor so the lines would need removed also.

The compressor has a metal gear for the drive with several teeth. The phenolic coupling that fastens to the auxilary shaft has corresponding teeth. I don't remember them being timed but are rather a slip fit. The compressor will slide right up to the mating surface if the teeth engage. Don't force it going back together, it's not needed.

Rob

do you know how the phenolic coupling fastens to the auxilary shaft im just trying to make sure its not going to fall off?

CHRIS CHESTANG

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do you know how the phenolic coupling fastens to the auxilary shaft im just trying to make sure its not going to fall off?

It is held on with a nut that is locked with a fold over washer onto the nut's flat. This is from what I've seen and could be different on later model trucks. It is securely fastened however.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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The oil compressor has a oil tube between the aux shaft and compressor shaft that can fall out snd not be seen untill the new compressor is on and running and KOCKING.The early engines did have to have the compressor timed and did have a pin in a blind spline on the drive. So if you get it up on there and it will not spline look at the timing.Can not remember what engines the timing stopped at.

glenn akers

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also my tachometer is broke any body know what that could be i don't know if its just the gauge or what?

I don't know if your tach is cable driven, or electronic. 1987 is a little newer than I'm normally exposed to. If it is cable driven the cable is most likely snapped from age/usage. It is driven from the front of the auxilary shaft on the rt. side of the engine forward of the compressor mounting. The cable inserts just below the injection pump with a knurled nut retaining it.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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its cable driven ive seen the cable i wondered if they had a problem with snaping do you know about how much they cost and are they hard to replace. and thanks for all the help again

They do not have a real problem with snapping, especially if they are maintained. Most don't think anything about a speedo, or tach cable till it no longer functions. At the age of your truck I would replace both the jacket, and cable assembly as a unit. Oil it yearly and it will outlast you. Use speedometer cable lube taking the top panel off the dash, unscrew, (or unclip) the jacket to instrument head, and pour oil in the jacket(s). Don't need an awful lot, probably about 1/2 ounce per cable. A small bottle should last several services.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Most tachs have a drive cable off of the pump.

Looks like a speedometer cable.

The inner cable gets twisted in two and the tach won't work!

Pull the end off of the pump and grab the end and give a bit of a pull.

If you get the thing to slide out, the drive cable is broken.

You'll have a nasty looking end.

Most parts stores have access to the cable and ends.

Putting the thing back together requires a bit more.

It has to go through the tach end first.

The cable needs to be lubed as it goes in.

I use Luberplate 105 to lube the cable.

There is some lubes that are for speedo and tach cables.

Use whatever but use something.

And one more thing - - - make the cable about 1/4 to 3/8 inch shorter than what you took out.

They stretch longer as they twist up.

Packer

Keep a clutchin'

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A 1987 would have a mechanical tach.

Also, before installing the new cable, make sure the tach head is not jammed up or the new cable will also snap right away. You can check the tach by inserting that adapter piece in the drive and turning it with your fingers. If it turns easily it's ok, if it's hard to turn or doesn't turn, then replace the tach too.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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