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International WorkStar With Cummins Engine Now in Production


kscarbel2
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Fleet Owner / July 8, 2015

International Truck has started production of its first International WorkStar vocational trucks powered by the Cummins ISB6.7 engine, the company announced. Both the WorkStar and the International DuraStar medium-duty truck are available with the ISB6.7 as an engine option.

"Production of the WorkStar with Cummins ISB6.7 is an important milestone in meeting the needs of vocational customers by providing a comprehensive offering of proven components," said Jeff Sass, Navistar senior vice president, North America truck sales and marketing. "The WorkStar with Cummins ISB6.7 gives customers a winning combination of performance and strength."

According to the company, the WorkStar boasts multiple-frame rail options, a double-sided galvanized steel cab protected by an extensive five-step corrosion protection process, and comes standard with the Diamond Logic electrical system. The addition of the Cummins ISB 6.7-liter engine expands the WorkStar model's extensive powertrain options, which include Navistar's proprietary 9.3-liter and 13-liter offerings.

WorkStar is also available with a suite of traditional manual and automated-manual transmission offerings from Eaton and fully-automatic offerings from Allison. The Cummins ISB6.7, rated up to 325 horsepower and 750lb.-ft. torque, features flexible horsepower and torque ratings, with higher ratings specifically for fire and emergency applications, the company said.

"The International WorkStar with Cummins ISB6.7 is the right truck for a large portion of our vocational customers," said David Hillman, vice president and general manager, International Truck Vocational Product Line. "Customers don't have to compromise. They can have it all—efficiency, comfort, capability, and now the proven Cummins ISB6.7 engine."


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I'm going to say this is because International is having to many problems with their emissions on their engines. I would not be surprised to see International cut down on production of their engines if not completely faze them out sometime down the road unless they figure something out soon. Just my $.02

Tony

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I'm going to say this is because International is having to many problems with their emissions on their engines. I would not be surprised to see International cut down on production of their engines if not completely faze them out sometime down the road unless they figure something out soon. Just my $.02

No more problems now, since Navistar went with SCR for its engine range.

But you are right, in offering Cummins ISBs, it reduces self-branded engine sales.

I'm concerned about the future of Cummins. The engine maker is innovating at a snail's pace. For every one step forward, global diesel engine makers are moving ahead two to three steps.

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I'm not sure I would say Cummins is innovating at a snails pace as much as them being slightly years ahead of everyone else most of the time. Yes at the moment everyone has caught up with Cummins but don't be surprised to see cummins come up with something in the next few years. Remember Cummins was 3 years ahead of everyone else when the 07 emissions standards came out and when the 2010 emissions came under law Cummins was already there when everyone else either had to get out of the game ( Cat ) or had to scramble to keep up. Cat is still having trouble meeting emissions on their heavy equipment as is Deere yet Case ( who uses Cummins engines even though they call them Case) and those others using Cummins engines are not having near the issues.

Tony

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I'm not sure I would say Cummins is innovating at a snails pace as much as them being slightly years ahead of everyone else most of the time. Yes at the moment everyone has caught up with Cummins but don't be surprised to see cummins come up with something in the next few years. Remember Cummins was 3 years ahead of everyone else when the 07 emissions standards came out and when the 2010 emissions came under law Cummins was already there when everyone else either had to get out of the game ( Cat ) or had to scramble to keep up. Cat is still having trouble meeting emissions on their heavy equipment as is Deere yet Case ( who uses Cummins engines even though they call them Case) and those others using Cummins engines are not having near the issues.

Cummins hasn't been "slightly years ahead of everyone else" in years.

The engine technology of every global truckmaker is far ahead of Cummins, beginning with Daimler (Detroit Diesel). The DD13, DD15 and DD16 (OM 471, OM472, OM473) are cutting edge. One can't put Cummins and "cutting edge" in the same sentence.

Their (SCR) emissions systems are the industries worst, and the ISV in the new NIssan pickup is an embarrassment.

Due to an inabiity to compete, Cummins lost the global truck market beginning with Europe (Cummins was the leader there in the day). The best they can do is build their old models in India.

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