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    Guest Message by DevFuse
     

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    Difficult Steering To The Left, Easy Steering To The Right?



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    10 replies to this topic

    #1 OFFLINE   treemuncher

    treemuncher

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    • Year:1986, 1992

    Posted 04 December 2007 - 10:07 AM

    My RD822 has power steering and a massive single steering box. The power steering pump is gear driven and the reservoir is full. When I try to make a sharp turn to the left, loaded or unloaded, the last two turns of the wheel prior to the stops are very difficult. Steering to the stops on the right turns is a breeze. I'm afraid I will get dizzy if I have to make all right turns on every trip!

    What should I be looking for to fix this issue? The king pins took grease without problems, the truck only has 91k on it, I did not see any damage to any of the components on a visual inspection. I'm thinking it must be the hydraulics because it only happens when turning to the left and the engine speed does not make a difference to the effort required to get it to turn.

    My Superliner was like this sometimes but I always thought that was because I took up the slack in the steering box. I've not made any adjustments to the steering on the RD yet. If I can get the left turns as easy as the right turns, I'll be happy.

    #2 OFFLINE   ThaddeusW

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 01:23 PM

    The spool valve or whatever its called controls the hydraulic pressure in the steering gear. Sometimes it goes and you have power steering in only one direction or none at all. Best bet is to have it rebuilt.
    -Thad
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    #3 OFFLINE   MidniteMechanic

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 01:39 PM

    Sounds like the poppet valves need adjusted.

    #4 OFFLINE   Rob

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 03:44 PM

    Sounds like the poppet valves need adjusted.


    If it is a Ross HF64 series, it does need poppet valves adjusted. If one "monkeys" with the poppet valve adjustments without knowlege, or proper tools, they will never be right and will provide the symptoms described. They must be adjusted equally to balance hydraulic steering pressure, (internal) from left to right.

    A blown, or partially blown "O" ring on either side of the power piston will give some of the same syptoms.

    Rob

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    #5 OFFLINE   treemuncher

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:21 PM

    Attached File  IMG_2731_cropd.JPG   757.8KB   5 downloads

    The name that is cast into the steering box is R.H. Sheppard Co. from PA. I did not see a tag or number on the unit at this time. According to the build notes from the Mack Museum, it is a 245-2204 steering unit 592s Shep-pwr(integral).

    Where can I find service literature for this? I can likely do any repairs myself. I've done quite a bit with hydraulic systems but pictures and exploded views really help. I'm sure there is a specific set-up sequence to follow as well in order to get everything adjusted evenly.

    Edited by treemuncher, 04 December 2007 - 08:33 PM.


    #6 OFFLINE   theakerstwo

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:33 PM

    The name that is cast into the steering box is R.H. Sheppard Co. from PA. I did not see a tag or number on the unit at this time. According to the build notes from the Mack Museum, it is a 245-2204 steering unit 592s Shep-pwr(integral).

    Where can I find service literature for this? I can likely do any repairs myself. I've done quite a bit with hydraulic systems but pictures and exploded views really help. I'm sure there is a specific set-up sequence to follow as well in order to get everything adjusted evenly.


    The problem with trying to do any major repairs on the steer box is if it is not a adjustment then it is worn parts and you may not be able to buy those parts.I know i can buy the out put shaft or some call it the cross shaft and bushing or if it uses brgs. for a kw but freightliner do not sell ant thing much more than a seal kit but dont know about mack but the last mack rebuilt box i got was around 450.00. alot of the time the slck is in the control valve and that is the heart of it. But the was i set the stops and poppet valves is jack up front and backoff botl poppets and i am talking about adjustable poppets some a automatic set when you install but back to setting poppets. Set you axle stops both at max to where the turn is about the same both ways and lock them and leve them along.you need a flowmeter to install inline on the supply line to the steer gear and then let the weight back down and then with engine running about 1000 rpm turn the steer wheel slow to one side and just as the axle stop comes in contact with the axle then you want see a pressure reduction and a flow to decress to about 25 to 50 psi on the pressure and i have used a 2500 psi pressure gauge only with out a flow meter and you will maybe be reading 500 psi on the gauge as the wheel is turned and the stop contacts the axle and you pressure should drop to about 25 to 50 psi. If it does not the screw in the stop till it reduces the pressure. If the pressure is reduced before the axle stop is contacted then back out the poppet screw. that will adjust the poppets. You sure have that engine painted good. glenn
    glenn akers

    #7 OFFLINE   fjh

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 09:12 PM

    Attached File  IMG_2731_cropd.JPG   757.8KB   5 downloads

    The name that is cast into the steering box is R.H. Sheppard Co. from PA. I did not see a tag or number on the unit at this time. According to the build notes from the Mack Museum, it is a 245-2204 steering unit 592s Shep-pwr(integral).

    Where can I find service literature for this? I can likely do any repairs myself. I've done quite a bit with hydraulic systems but pictures and exploded views really help. I'm sure there is a specific set-up sequence to follow as well in order to get everything adjusted evenly.


    Two things! first to set the steering to max both sides on the bottom of the box there is what looks like a hole stick a flat blade screw driver that will fit the hole and back the screw out one turn that should affect the turn wider For one side( RH I beleive) long as its not hitting the circle stops on the axle first! you can also do the same for the other direction on the top of the box the same hole same place on the top! same proseedure you may have to turn the stops in a tad to acheive what you want!Second ,on an RD800 the ujoints can seem good but be stiff! check em out! remove the shaft from the box and the steady bearing and check everything for being free EVEN the steady bearing these can be seased and give you false feeling in the steering wheel!Replace em if your unsure of them!

    #8 OFFLINE   theakerstwo

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    Posted 04 December 2007 - 09:15 PM

    My RD822 has power steering and a massive single steering box. The power steering pump is gear driven and the reservoir is full. When I try to make a sharp turn to the left, loaded or unloaded, the last two turns of the wheel prior to the stops are very difficult. Steering to the stops on the right turns is a breeze. I'm afraid I will get dizzy if I have to make all right turns on every trip!

    What should I be looking for to fix this issue? The king pins took grease without problems, the truck only has 91k on it, I did not see any damage to any of the components on a visual inspection. I'm thinking it must be the hydraulics because it only happens when turning to the left and the engine speed does not make a difference to the effort required to get it to turn.

    My Superliner was like this sometimes but I always thought that was because I took up the slack in the steering box. I've not made any adjustments to the steering on the RD yet. If I can get the left turns as easy as the right turns, I'll be happy.


    Another thing that will cause the box to turn hard to one side is if a punp is weak and will not build enough pressure any time then when loaded one side of the turn could be harder.The reason is because in a steer box there is more squar inches of piston on the bottom side than there is on the top side and that is ok when you pump can build enough pressure when needed but if you are loaded and the punp will not put out more than say 600 or 800 psi then that will be something you will feel different from one side to the other. That is the reason you need a flowmeter to monitor the flow and pressure as you go thru the turn both way.If a piston ring is leaking you can monitor the flow sa it looses power.I lik to put a block of wood between the tire and wheel and block the movement as you monitor the flow and about 1000 rpm and if a piston ring is leaking you will notice the flow go up and the pressure go down .
    Most pumps are about 6 gpm flow. If you are monitoring the flow meter and the flow goes down and the pressure goes down from one side read to the other side turn reading then you may say that the control valve is wore out and the on that box there it is not much you can do.
    glenn akers

    #9 OFFLINE   Bollweevil

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    Posted 05 December 2007 - 08:39 AM

    When you look at all the "bility's" involved, Your ability to make it work, the availability of parts, the liability involved if something did go wrong. Then a reconditioned steering gear looks a lot more attractive. Downtime is always a factor also. Check with Atlanta Gear And Axle 404 691 7662. They can answer any question you might have regarding your steering gear. If they don't have a gear in stock they can repair yours. James

    #10 OFFLINE   treemuncher

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    Posted 05 December 2007 - 09:23 AM

    I had another thought this morning. Now knowing about the internal stops and the types of adjustments required on these boxes, maybe someone had removed the pitman arm in the past and put it back together one or two notches over from the original position. That is if it is possible to reassemble it in the wrong position.

    This would account for full power all of the way to the right stops and an early loss of power towards the left if I am understanding the previous posts regarding how the mechanism works. With the low mileage on the truck, this would make the most sense to me and it would also be the easiest fix. Somehow, I'm not so sure Mr. Murphy and his laws would let this pass if he knows anything about it, but it is the first thing I will check.

    Thanks to all for your input.

    #11 OFFLINE   Rob

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    • Year:1951 1957 1958 1962 1964 1973 1974 1978 1977 1980

    Posted 05 December 2007 - 09:28 AM

    When you look at all the "bility's" involved, Your ability to make it work, the availability of parts, the liability involved if something did go wrong. Then a reconditioned steering gear looks a lot more attractive. Downtime is always a factor also. Check with Atlanta Gear And Axle 404 691 7662. They can answer any question you might have regarding your steering gear. If they don't have a gear in stock they can repair yours. James


    You're absolutely correct in the availability of parts James. Dealerships in the 70's used to have access to any part you would need for most any unit on the truck be it steering, transmission, rears, or the like. Now small parts are not obtainable a good portion of the time. I rebuilt steering boxes, A/C compressors, P/S pumps and even water pumps in my early days, all with parts that were readily available at the time. Those days are for the most part gone. There are still a lot of specialty parts vendors out there, but it takes some digging to find them. I have found a lot of steering rebuilders will sell you parts needed to reman your own and some will not citing liability issues.

    We live in todays economy where cheaper, (not always better) is what sells, and a reman unit in some cases is less expensive than doing the job yourself. I was always too "cheap" to pay for something I could do myself so I'm naturally biased. I've recently purchased a gasket and seal kit for a leaking Ross HF64 series steering gear for $49.00 due to a leak. Hard to justify $650.00 or better for a reman unit when there is nothing wrong internally with mine. I also trust my own work but admittedly ask a lot of questions to avoid mistakes.

    Atlanta Gear and Axle is a good, reliable vendor and I have used them in the past. I would recommend them if a gear needs replacement.

    Rob

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