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Small Brake Fluid Leak


609albert
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HI GUY'S , can I use teflon tape or liquid on threads on a small leak on my truck with hydralic brakes , or any suggestions?

No is the correct answer Albert. Steel lines have a 45 degree double flare end to them to ensure a pressure proof seal. Should you need to cut and section a steel brake line use only a steel compression type fitting if not replacing the complete line. Brass will work for a time but have been known to fail, (split) due to the crimping pressure necessary to properly seal the fitting to the line.

A flexible line will have straight threads and use a copper "crush washer" to facilitate a leakproof seal, or use a crimped fitting. A leaking hose at a fitting needs replaced any way it is looked at.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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And if you want to know why the answer is simple. Some Teflon tape can come loose in the lines and make its way back to the master cylinder and clog the valves up. The flare joints are more then enough to seal the lines. If you have a leak then you need to replace the leaky fittings or lines.

-Thad

What America needs is less bull and more Bulldog!

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HI GUY'S , can I use teflon tape or liquid on threads on a small leak on my truck with hydralic brakes , or any suggestions?

Depends on what is leaking. You might have some success using a sealer on a NPT fitting. It would be of little use on a flare type fitting, common on most brake systems.

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No is the correct answer Albert. Steel lines have a 45 degree double flare end to them to ensure a pressure proof seal. Should you need to cut and section a steel brake line use only a steel compression type fitting if not replacing the complete line. Brass will work for a time but have been known to fail, (split) due to the crimping pressure necessary to properly seal the fitting to the line.

A flexible line will have straight threads and use a copper "crush washer" to facilitate a leakproof seal, or use a crimped fitting. A leaking hose at a fitting needs replaced any way it is looked at.

Rob

Rob is very right on this one here.

Along with this brake fluid is a solvent and would dissovle the tefflon, alson plug things up

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