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Looking for Axle/Differential Tech Data


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Good afternoon everyone!

 

I am working on one heck of a contraption I guess you could say, and the Mack drop-in differentials/housings appear to be an ideal configuration for what we're working on (unfortunately, about all I can say about the use is that they won't be driving wheels and tires - but you're welcome to speculate!).  I have a pretty extensive automotive background so I can generally speak the language, but I am struggling a bit with finding more specific data on things like carrier models, available ratios, HP/torque ratings, and things of that nature for things in the heavy truck world (in contrast to, say, a Dana 60 where one click in Google will yield anything you could possibly want to know).

 

So far I have been basically just collecting bits and pieces of information from use parts dealers and eBay listings, but I was wondering if there's some sort of resource for this sort of information that I am overlooking.  Even just a brief rundown on the different models and what can be learned from the designations would be helpful!

 

Thanks in advance for any help anyone is willing to give - it's greatly appreciated!

 

Take care,

-CTD

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Variations of the 92/93 usually found in 34, 38 and 44K rated suspension. 112/113 55K rate. 95/96 used in 65 and 80K.

92 front carrier and 93 rear carrier.

The carriers would be used in trucks with 250 HP to 500+ HP with torque up to 1300-1400.

Mack Carrier.jpg

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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12 hours ago, j hancock said:

Variations of the 92/93 usually found in 34, 38 and 44K rated suspension. 112/113 55K rate. 95/96 used in 65 and 80K.

92 front carrier and 93 rear carrier.

The carriers would be used in trucks with 250 HP to 500+ HP with torque up to 1300-1400.

 

Jim, thank you very much!  That is quite helpful, and I really appreciate it!

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23 hours ago, CrashTestDummy said:

Good afternoon everyone!

 

I am working on one heck of a contraption I guess you could say, and the Mack drop-in differentials/housings appear to be an ideal configuration for what we're working on (unfortunately, about all I can say about the use is that they won't be driving wheels and tires - but you're welcome to speculate!).  I have a pretty extensive automotive background so I can generally speak the language, but I am struggling a bit with finding more specific data on things like carrier models, available ratios, HP/torque ratings, and things of that nature for things in the heavy truck world (in contrast to, say, a Dana 60 where one click in Google will yield anything you could possibly want to know).

 

So far I have been basically just collecting bits and pieces of information from use parts dealers and eBay listings, but I was wondering if there's some sort of resource for this sort of information that I am overlooking.  Even just a brief rundown on the different models and what can be learned from the designations would be helpful!

 

Thanks in advance for any help anyone is willing to give - it's greatly appreciated!

 

Take care,

-CTD

If you can be atleast a bit specific as to what Engine/Motor you are planning to run, input and output RPM's, Torques, expected life etc I might be able to help. CRD92/93 is out of production since 2009. The newer carrier series are CRD125/126 (125,000 lbs GCW - Linehaul); CRD150/151 (150,000 lbs GCW - Linehaul), CRD180/181 (180,000 lbs GCW - Linehaul); CRD95/96 (235,000 lbs GCW - Linehaul). CRD95/96 has been in production since 1945 and doesn't follow newer naming designation.

 

image.png.5de12f31f5057a635a667412e0e86465.png

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On 7/31/2020 at 9:23 AM, kt_Engineer said:

If you can be atleast a bit specific as to what Engine/Motor you are planning to run, input and output RPM's, Torques, expected life etc I might be able to help.

That's another great chart - thank you!

Unfortunately I can't really share any other information (they've 'let people go' for this sort of thing in the past so I'm erring on the side of caution), but this is also very helpful.

Edited by CrashTestDummy
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On 7/31/2020 at 2:37 PM, CrashTestDummy said:

That's another great chart - thank you!

Unfortunately I can't really share any other information (they've 'let people go' for this sort of thing in the past so I'm erring on the side of caution), but this is also very helpful.

Anything done outside the scope of normal application always voids Manufacturing warranty and OEM will not be liable for anything that could go wrong (on your "contraption").

If the carrier is being driven through some electric motor/engine with a reduction gear-box in between and another reduction boxes on each axle output end, the carriers can be expected to fail relatively quickly in 50-100 hr window depending on input torque/RPM. Depending on load applied either a gear tooth bending failure or gear surface fatigue failure can occur. Most possibly #2, #3 or differential bearings will go bad before gear failure. Changing out bearings @ 50hr interval can extend the carrier life.

CRD150-151 (Ratio 3.11 to 6.53); CRD180-181 (Ratio 3.79 to 7.08) and CRD125/126 (2.54, 2.66 & 2.83) have a differential lock. The diff. lock can be engaged using a pressurized air or mechanically pushing the piston (using a threaded bolt) to engage the diff. fork clutch. Engaging the diff. lock will allow torque to be driven through one side/both side of axle shafts but could potentially fail the axle shaft and load one of the differential bearing more than other side. 

Since CRD180-181 etc are tandems (2-drives connected with intermediary inter-axle shaft) so driving through CRD181 (Rear-rear carrier makes more sense. CRD180 will have inter-axle differential/PDLO which will need to be locked out to transmit torque to gears). 

Perfect straight angle drivelines are never a good idea as U-Joint fretting and other issues will scew the torques. Slight U-joint angle (<1 degree) will work well. CRD181 with targeted ratio around ~ 4.45:1 to 5:1 might be better choice if input motor/engine have sufficient HP/Troque/Speed range along with gearboxes (with appropriate gear ratios).

 

 

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