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Mack Type 45


mjmccaffrey
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Gentlemen,

I'm hoping to get my 1948 Mack Type 45 under cover and running in the next couple of weeks before the snow flies. Not being of sound mechanical knowledge, I look to anyone on this board for suggestions as to where to start this process. Some background: engine was last turned over in June of '07. It is a Continental 330 four-cycle gasoline engine with all six cylinders cast in one block. Rebuilt in 1984. Several people have told me to lubricate the crap out of it before turning it over and I could not agree more. Certain that I have condensation in the gas tank so I'm wondering if I should siphon it or does it have a drain plug? Have the battery on a charger right now. I'd certainly appreciate anyone out there who could provide a little insight/direction as to where to start and what products are best suited for this initial start after a couple of years of inactivity. The MORE DETAIL, the better as suggestions come in....

Thanks.

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Gentlemen,

I'm hoping to get my 1948 Mack Type 45 under cover and running in the next couple of weeks before the snow flies. Not being of sound mechanical knowledge, I look to anyone on this board for suggestions as to where to start this process. Some background: engine was last turned over in June of '07. It is a Continental 330 four-cycle gasoline engine with all six cylinders cast in one block. Rebuilt in 1984. Several people have told me to lubricate the crap out of it before turning it over and I could not agree more. Certain that I have condensation in the gas tank so I'm wondering if I should siphon it or does it have a drain plug? Have the battery on a charger right now. I'd certainly appreciate anyone out there who could provide a little insight/direction as to where to start and what products are best suited for this initial start after a couple of years of inactivity. The MORE DETAIL, the better as suggestions come in....

Thanks.

You failed to provide a lot of information that would be helpful. Regarding the engine, I would turn it over by hand with a socket on the front of the crank and a long pull bar. See how it feels. Is it seized up....or does the engine turn over with the same resistance at all points in the rotation? If it does not turn by hand or has hard spots when turning the crank, you probably have internal problems with the engine. Was the fuel tank closed or has it sat without a fuel cap? Are there obvious signs of rust when you look down the filler neck? If the truck has been in service, and the fuel tank has not been left open to the elements with no cap on it, I would add a limited amount of fuel along with a moisture treatment. I would then disconnect the fuel line where it connects to the fuel filter, and while someone turns the engine over, I'd catch the fuel in something so that I could examine it for contamination. If there is no debris and the fuel does not appear contaminated, I would connect the line back to the engine. I'm no mechanic...but growing up my Dad gave me a significant amount of common horse sense. I don't think what I am suggesting would heart anything. Let me know if I'm off base guys.

Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.

Kenny Lane

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Gentlemen,

I'm hoping to get my 1948 Mack Type 45 under cover and running in the next couple of weeks before the snow flies. Not being of sound mechanical knowledge, I look to anyone on this board for suggestions as to where to start this process. Some background: engine was last turned over in June of '07. It is a Continental 330 four-cycle gasoline engine with all six cylinders cast in one block. Rebuilt in 1984. Several people have told me to lubricate the crap out of it before turning it over and I could not agree more. Certain that I have condensation in the gas tank so I'm wondering if I should siphon it or does it have a drain plug? Have the battery on a charger right now. I'd certainly appreciate anyone out there who could provide a little insight/direction as to where to start and what products are best suited for this initial start after a couple of years of inactivity. The MORE DETAIL, the better as suggestions come in....

Thanks.

I would say you should check & change the oil once you have turned the engine over with the booster reel crank handle. See if you have any water or antifreeze in the oil that you drained out. If this OK check for a good spark. For fuel use a separate gas can. I know this is not everything, but you should be able to get a good handle on it. Along with the words from Kenny.

Ray

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Engine 2:

FYI: Hancock, NH still has their 1945 Mack Type 45. I'm not sure if

it is owned by the department or privately owned but they might be

a source if you need any information. Plymouth, NH had a 1949 Type 45;

maybe you could contact them and find out whatever happened to it.

Type 45 guys have to stick together and I'm sure that someone would

be able to assist you. Good luck.

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Engine 2 from Engine 2, your 'southern' cousin.

What results did you get for starting the engine? Did it start?

If the fuel is that old, drain it off. It could be bad or turned to varnish. There should be a 3/8 inch brass plug in the exact center of the bottom of the tank. If that doesn't work, pull the fuel line off before the carb and crank the engine with distributor wire off. This way, the engine won't start, then stop. If you have an electric fuel pump, just disconnect the fuel line from the carb. and turn on the ignition, the fuel pump should run, draining the tank.

Looking down the gas tank filler pipe won't show what the tanks insides looks like because there is a slight bend in it just before the tank. Lift up the front seats, the fuel guage sending unit and syphon pipe are top center. You may have to remove the large sheet steel plate on top of the whole thing. Might not, too. Remove wire lead going to fuel guage, disconnect fuel syphon pipe fitting going to carb, then 4 Phillips head screws, lift off sending unit, watch for the float, and you can see the bottom of the tank.

Before starting, hand crank if possible. If not possible, try using starter motor. If you remove the plugs, it should be easier, no compression. Could put a tablespoon of 3-in-1 oil in each cylinder before turning, letting it soak a couple days.

Regap the plugs before putting them back in, or buy new ones. I think D-14 or D-16 Champions fit, that's what I use.

Clean and regap the points, or get new cap, points, rotor and condenser. NAPA has them, at most an overnite wait.

Remove the ends of the battery cables and clean them. They are at the starter, battery terminals, starter solenoid (on firewall), possibly a floor button or firewall button,a nd the ground return lead. The ground should be attached to the engine block near the starter, not on the chassis. That removes two connections that can suck away current/voltage when starting. A secondary ground can then be run from the engine to the frame. Charge the battery after checking the water level.

Check water/water antifreeze solution level of the radiator.

Clean out the mouse nest in the air filter. Clean out old oil bath and refill filter.

Sit back in the seat, and try to start it. If it starts, don't over rev it, let it idle. Have a second person standing by with a fire extinguisher incase something goes wrong.

DON'T CRANK TOO LONG. You're using 6 volts, I presume. Your starter draws alot of current and will heat up your cables quickly if it doesn't start.

You're trying to move a very old big engine that hasn't started in a long time, with old oil, unless you changed that and the filter, before hand.

What happened?????

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  • 3 weeks later...

Engine 2 from Engine 2, your 'southern' cousin.

What results did you get for starting the engine? Did it start?

If the fuel is that old, drain it off. It could be bad or turned to varnish. There should be a 3/8 inch brass plug in the exact center of the bottom of the tank. If that doesn't work, pull the fuel line off before the carb and crank the engine with distributor wire off. This way, the engine won't start, then stop. If you have an electric fuel pump, just disconnect the fuel line from the carb. and turn on the ignition, the fuel pump should run, draining the tank.

Looking down the gas tank filler pipe won't show what the tanks insides looks like because there is a slight bend in it just before the tank. Lift up the front seats, the fuel guage sending unit and syphon pipe are top center. You may have to remove the large sheet steel plate on top of the whole thing. Might not, too. Remove wire lead going to fuel guage, disconnect fuel syphon pipe fitting going to carb, then 4 Phillips head screws, lift off sending unit, watch for the float, and you can see the bottom of the tank.

Before starting, hand crank if possible. If not possible, try using starter motor. If you remove the plugs, it should be easier, no compression. Could put a tablespoon of 3-in-1 oil in each cylinder before turning, letting it soak a couple days.

Regap the plugs before putting them back in, or buy new ones. I think D-14 or D-16 Champions fit, that's what I use.

Clean and regap the points, or get new cap, points, rotor and condenser. NAPA has them, at most an overnite wait.

Remove the ends of the battery cables and clean them. They are at the starter, battery terminals, starter solenoid (on firewall), possibly a floor button or firewall button,a nd the ground return lead. The ground should be attached to the engine block near the starter, not on the chassis. That removes two connections that can suck away current/voltage when starting. A secondary ground can then be run from the engine to the frame. Charge the battery after checking the water level.

Check water/water antifreeze solution level of the radiator.

Clean out the mouse nest in the air filter. Clean out old oil bath and refill filter.

Sit back in the seat, and try to start it. If it starts, don't over rev it, let it idle. Have a second person standing by with a fire extinguisher incase something goes wrong.

DON'T CRANK TOO LONG. You're using 6 volts, I presume. Your starter draws alot of current and will heat up your cables quickly if it doesn't start.

You're trying to move a very old big engine that hasn't started in a long time, with old oil, unless you changed that and the filter, before hand.

What happened?????

Gentlemen,

To date I have installed new points and spark plugs, coolant/water (50/50), drained and replaced oil, cleaned,replaced, and re-filled oil bath. Cleaned fuel filter sediment tube. Also replaced battery cable, battery ground cable and starter ground cable ($$$ :blink: ). Have also pulled the gas tank and sent it to be cleaned and refinished. Poured some Marvel Mystery oil into the cylinders and let sit for 3 days. Attempted to crank it without spark plugs and got about less than a 1/4 turn before it jammed with a thud. Lights shine brightly, siren is LOUD and interior dash light/guages illuminate. What kind of trouble am I in here?......What's my next move?? Many THANKS for the advise thus far; its been very helpful.

E2

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Good suggestion, Packer. Remove the valve adjustment covers on the side of the engine and take a peek.

What could have made that 'thud' that E2 heard, after the 1/4 turn? I could see a stuck valve, but would that stop all movement? I suppose if it stuck closed, then the rocker wouldn't move, and anything connected with it would stop moving, too. But, if you could go backwards 1/4 turn. Would that prove anything?

Looks like E2 is heading in the correct direction with working on the periphial stuff, ie gas tank, sediment bowl, cables, etc., and prepping the engine, little by little.

It just went 'thud', huh? Tranny in neutral, clutch released? Sounds like the tranny maybe was left in gear, but the gears were not engaged. When the flywheel rotated just enough, everything lined up and 'thud', it all fell into gear, and stuck.

Or, did something jam under the distributor cap, since you did work under that?

When you cleaned the sediment bowl, did you remove the fuel pump from the engine block to do it? If you did, was the 'finger' put back above or below the cam inside the engine, where it was removed from?

Just thinking out loud........

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