Jump to content

  •  

  • Welcome to BigMackTrucks.com

    Welcome to BigMackTrucks.com, the best resource on the Internet for Antique, Classic and Modern Mack Trucks!  

     

    Please login or register to take advantage of everything BMT has to offer.  Memberships are Free and offer many benefits:

     

    • Start new topics and reply to others
    • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
    • Showcase your trucks in our Garage
    • Photo Gallery, Member Blogs and much more...
    • Add events to our community calendar
    • Create your own profile and make new friends
    • Customize your experience!
    • Mack Dealer and Corporate personnel can contact the ADMIN after registration for access to the Dealer Forums.

    If you are having trouble logging in or haven't received your validation email, you can post as a guest in the Guest Forum.


    login  register
    Guest Message by DevFuse
     

    Photo

    Door Hinges Wore Out



    • Please log in to reply
    7 replies to this topic

    #1 OFFLINE   16390

    16390

      16390

    • Big Dog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 130 posts
    • Location:Bakersfield, Ca.
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:H-63T, H-61T
    • Year:1957, 1953

    Posted 06 July 2010 - 02:37 AM

    Need to know of a good fix if any for my door hinges. The doors on my H-63 are plum wore out, the doors are sagging due to the pin holes being wore out and oblonged. There is no adjustment other than shimming the backs of the hinges so the pin hole location is important. Got all my exterior sheetmetal work done, woooohooo, now onto door placement prior to the bodywork but my door alignment is no good. Not sure if my hinges would interchange with any other models. I'm sure if I found some others they'd probably be worn out to. Let me know, I'm rockin and rollin on her again. My passenger side lower hinge where it bolts to the cab frame has 2 old bolts snapped off inside the holes and someone had attempted to drill them out before but must have given up cause the holes look awful. The other 2 holes have been drilled oversize so I should be able to re-drill and helicoil those. Like I said the location of the holes are critical as there is no side to side or up and down adjustment on these at all. All ideas appreciated here.

    #2 OFFLINE   Rob

    Rob

      Bloated Dieselholic

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 10,191 posts
    • Location:Mack Paradise-Farmington, Illinois
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:A-40H, B-61T, B-61ST, B-67ST, B-61S, RL-797LST, RL-797LST, RL-755L, R795, R612ST
    • Year:1951 1957 1958 1962 1964 1973 1974 1978 1977 1980

    Posted 06 July 2010 - 07:47 AM

    Does anybody you know have a milling machine? I've made a jig in the past that was clamped into a vise, aligned the hinge so the hole was centerlined on the end mill, then plunge cut a new hole through the top hole, flip the hinge and do the same for the lower hole. Prior to actual work commencing one would need to pick out a bushing with the correct inner and outer diameter you plan to use. After the hole is bored, you can then bush the hole back to the correct inner diameter.

    For making hinge pins, I like to use water hardening "drill rod" in 3/8ths diameter. It will be sold in a soft state so it can be worked with. Cut this drill rod to the correct length but leave about 7/16" to work with and form a head for the pin. I take a small oxyacetylene torch outfit and with the pin clamped into a bench vise warm the tip till a almost white color then "peen" the end to a rounded shape with a dinging hammer, (small hammer). After forming into a semi circular ball end, let the part cool and grab the other non formed end with a pair of vise grip pliers and again heat the part to a dull red color. While still red and hot, plunge the part into a bucket of water that is about 175 degrees and swish around for about 30 seconds, place on bench and let cool. As of now this part will be very hard, but very brittle and will not yield good service. After it cools, place on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven, (usually a good idea to obtain wife's clearance first) and place the heat on about 350 degrees for two to three hours. This is know as tempering, and normalizing. After this amount of time, remove from the oven and let it cool. It will now be ready for grinding on a bench grinder to finish form the head. The part will be very hard, but have ductility and not break easily. I wouldn't skip the last step at all. I have personally take 1/2" drill rod in it's hardended state, placed it on a welding table and smacked it smartly with a 2lb sledge breaking it into a couple of pieces that went flying.

    As far as the retention area(s) of the hinges, I'd just bore right through the center and helicoil, or threadsert as you mention. It can be difficult to undo someone elses' mess sometimes. I've even blown the center section out of hinges, welded them up, and using some sort of pattern, (like another hinge plate), remade the part. It is nothing but plain A36 grade mild steel strap and easy to work with.

    Rob

    Going through life knowing considerably more about nothing than the next person.

    ParadeRain.gif
    Raining on your parade


    #3 OFFLINE   Freightrain

    Freightrain

      Gear jam'n fool

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3,122 posts
    • Location:Ohio
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:B61
    • Year:59

    Posted 06 July 2010 - 08:21 AM

    My drivers door was wasted when I bought the truck too. I went to Azone and found a bushing kit with a pin the size to match. Pulled one hinge off at a time, fixed the hinge and replaced it. Never had to take the whole door off. I also fixed the tension spring that holds the door open too. Won't call it perfectly new, but works great(don't get bashed in the back of the head getting in/out anymore).

    Rob, I have a small mill at home(let along BIG ones at work). I did mine by hand though, as it was before I had one at home.
    Larry

    1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

    Posted Image

    Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

    #4 OFFLINE   Rob

    Rob

      Bloated Dieselholic

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 10,191 posts
    • Location:Mack Paradise-Farmington, Illinois
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:A-40H, B-61T, B-61ST, B-67ST, B-61S, RL-797LST, RL-797LST, RL-755L, R795, R612ST
    • Year:1951 1957 1958 1962 1964 1973 1974 1978 1977 1980

    Posted 06 July 2010 - 09:00 AM

    My drivers door was wasted when I bought the truck too. I went to Azone and found a bushing kit with a pin the size to match. Pulled one hinge off at a time, fixed the hinge and replaced it. Never had to take the whole door off. I also fixed the tension spring that holds the door open too. Won't call it perfectly new, but works great(don't get bashed in the back of the head getting in/out anymore).

    Rob, I have a small mill at home(let along BIG ones at work). I did mine by hand though, as it was before I had one at home.

    I never had good luck filing holes back round to fit bushings into. Although the OEM replacement bushings are knurled on the exterior dimension to fit imperfect holes, I've found they fracture over time. This coupled with most of the replacement pins are of two different dimentions I found it easier to make a few at a time and they worked well. GM is really the only manufacturer that offered readily replaceable pins and bushing as they are a consumable item that doesn't last. There is not enough load bearing surface to support the weight of the swinging door.

    Momma won't let me buy anything unless there is a need for it. I'd really like to have a vertical mill and engine lathe again. Herb has located a nice lathe but I can't get clearance to purchase it, (yet). The last truck I dragged home was the perverbial "straw" and she'd had enough of nothing finished, but plenty torn apart. I'm working on that nightly.

    Rob

    Going through life knowing considerably more about nothing than the next person.

    ParadeRain.gif
    Raining on your parade


    #5 OFFLINE   vanscottbuilders

    vanscottbuilders

      BMT Forum Guru

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 656 posts
    • Location:Fishers, NY
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:B73ST
    • Year:1957

    Posted 06 July 2010 - 02:46 PM

    Tony,
    I think that the door hinges for your H-63 are the same as any "L" cab Mack, and might be fairly common.
    Finding some good used ones to replace yours would be the simplest solution.
    Absent that, finding a used set to repair makes sense. As Rob said, setting up a jig and doing some
    machining is a good solution. And, you still have your originals if things don't go well.
    Paul Van Scott

    #6 OFFLINE   Freightrain

    Freightrain

      Gear jam'n fool

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 3,122 posts
    • Location:Ohio
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:B61
    • Year:59

    Posted 07 July 2010 - 09:57 PM

    It's been 9 yrs and the door still works perfect(for a 50 yr old truck). Since I don't use it everyday and surely don't hang on it the dodge? pins I used musta worked. I agree, they aren't the perfect solution, but a viable one for the do it yourselfer.
    Larry

    1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

    Posted Image

    Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

    #7 OFFLINE   Mike Sheldon

    Mike Sheldon

      First Gear

    • Puppy Poster
    • PipPipPip
    • 14 posts
    • Location:Polk City
    • Make:Ford F150
    • Model:Ford F150
    • Year:2003

    Posted 23 July 2010 - 03:03 AM

    you sure you need whole hinge and they dont make a repair kit for it many cars they do have a kit to replace ive never had to buy a whole hinge and you might try ebay or type VW parts into search box and get more places to buy from other than dealer

    #8 OFFLINE   ThaddeusW

    ThaddeusW

      MadMacks

    • Pedigreed Bulldog
    • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
    • 1,779 posts
    • Location:Ozone Park, New York City
    • Make:Mack
    • Model:B61
    • Year:1961

    Posted 23 July 2010 - 05:45 PM

    Ha! I remember the days when my father used to temper parts at home (We used to have a machine shop and my father was a metallurgical engineer). My mom was never crazy about it but it did the job.
    -Thad
    What America needs is less bull and more Bulldog!




    0 user(s) are reading this topic

    0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users