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Diesel Fuel Lubricity Study


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Diesel Fuel Lubricity Study


This is not my work. I take no credit for it. Any and all credit for this information goes to the organizations and individuals listed at the end of the article. This verbiage is presented, without comment or endorsement, for informational purposes only. The following link will take you to the www.dieselplace.com website, where the information came from. http://www.dieselplace.com/forum/76-speciality-forums/64-maintenance-fluids/177728-lubricity-additive-study-results.html The following ar

 

"Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines."

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Thanks for posting the article. I am not going to "bad mouth" any product. But the company I worked for provides the additive package for Stanadyne. I was involved with product development (field testing) many years ago. I know it works so I am staying with the Stanadyne product. If anyone is not familiar with Stanadyne, they manufacture rotary fuel lubricated injection pumps. They were the first company to address lubricity issues and develop testing standards.

ASTM D975 Diesel fuel standard has a specification for lubricity that No.1 and No.2 Diesel fuel must meet. So in essence, lubricity is not an issue in today's Diesel fuel.

As for bioDiesel....it does provide improved lubricity but it also reduces the BTU content (power) of the fuel and has POOR cold flow properties.

Bottom line is "something is better than nothing" in today's ULSD fuel.

Also, pre-2000 engines are more "forgiving" of low sulfur fuel because of lower injection pressures.

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Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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Thanks for posting the article. I am not going to "bad mouth" any product. But the company I worked for provides the additive package for Stanadyne. I was involved with product development (field testing) many years ago. I know it works so I am staying with the Stanadyne product. If anyone is not familiar with Stanadyne, they manufacture rotary fuel lubricated injection pumps. They were the first company to address lubricity issues and develop testing standards.

ASTM D975 Diesel fuel standard has a specification for lubricity that No.1 and No.2 Diesel fuel must meet. So in essence, lubricity is not an issue in today's Diesel fuel.

As for bioDiesel....it does provide improved lubricity but it also reduces the BTU content (power) of the fuel and has POOR cold flow properties.

Bottom line is "something is better than nothing" in today's ULSD fuel.

Also, pre-2000 engines are more "forgiving" of low sulfur fuel because of lower injection pressures.

Yeah, I think the biggest issue is in higher-fuel-pressure engines made between 2000 and 2008. The reduction in sulphur in 2008 reduced the lubricity of the fuel, which could hurt those pumps.

I do have to disagree on 1 little issue, however. According to this study, SOME of the additives actually REDUCE the lubricity. That means they INCREASE the wear on the pump. So, in those particular cases, NOTHING is better then SOMETHING...at least when discussing lubricity.

To be honest, I had actually used the 2-cycle oil additive before, because the study showed it actually did help a little! But, you know that stuff probably didn't clean anything!

And, remember, this article is solely discussing the LUBRICTY benefits of various additives. Even some of the additives which made no difference in lubricity probably helped cetane rating, cleaned injector nozzles, and stuff like that.

It's always good to hear from you, Farmer!

"Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines."

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Most multi-functional Diesel fuel additive packages contain, in addition to lubricity, detergents, dispersants, oxidation stabilizers, corrosion inhibitors, and demulsifiers. Cetane improver and anti-gel are extras.

I should have mentioned, the company I worked for also supplies additives to other fuel additive (both gasoline and Diesel) companies. Some companies have their own chemical formulators and buy components (such as those listed above) and make their own "cocktail". Some fuel additive companies will purchase a fully formulated package and just bottle/label the product.

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Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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