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Tie Rod Ends


leversole
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My tie rod ends are garbage! Is this a standard stock parts item? Mack dealer only?

The steer axle is an FA517.

Thanks

Depends. That axle was offered with both internal threaded, and external threaded tie rod ends. If you have the internal threaded type that screw onto the external center link threads, you may want to purchase extra lube cause your gonna need it for the ensuing pain of the purchase. If they are external threaded type, you can purchase them for about $40.00 each. Obtaining the female threaded type is getting a bit tough also.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Depends. That axle was offered with both internal threaded, and external threaded tie rod ends. If you have the internal threaded type that screw onto the external center link threads, you may want to purchase extra lube cause your gonna need it for the ensuing pain of the purchase. If they are external threaded type, you can purchase them for about $40.00 each. Obtaining the female threaded type is getting a bit tough also.

Rob

Got lucky on this one...tie rods ends are externally threaded...

Is the tie rod supposed to be straight? Mine has a nice bow towards the crossmember...

is this the design or did someone try to back over a stump?

Thanks

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Got lucky on this one...tie rods ends are externally threaded...

Is the tie rod supposed to be straight? Mine has a nice bow towards the crossmember...

is this the design or did someone try to back over a stump?

Thanks

If you are referring to the long tube that connects the left tie rod end to the right tie rod end, this part is called the center link. It is supposed to be straight on the lightweight axles. The heavier rated steer axles use a formed with a drop center type center link.

Remove your tie rod ends and take to the parts store with you. Most parts stores won't have an application guide for your truck but they can measure the existing ends to find replacements. There are exceptions to this however. The length from thread start to centerline of taper stud, length of taper stud, thread count, are all important to ensure you get the correct part(s). There really aren't that many different ones used so the process is quite easy with an experienced parts person.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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If you are referring to the long tube that connects the left tie rod end to the right tie rod end, this part is called the center link. It is supposed to be straight on the lightweight axles. The heavier rated steer axles use a formed with a drop center type center link.

Remove your tie rod ends and take to the parts store with you. Most parts stores won't have an application guide for your truck but they can measure the existing ends to find replacements. There are exceptions to this however. The length from thread start to centerline of taper stud, length of taper stud, thread count, are all important to ensure you get the correct part(s). There really aren't that many different ones used so the process is quite easy with an experienced parts person.

Rob

Thanks Rob, I'll post some pics tomorrow, I think mine is just bent!

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Thanks Rob, I'll post some pics tomorrow, I think mine is just bent!

Be sure to count the number of turns it takes to remove each tie rod end as to allow the adjustments to be close when the new parts are reinstalled. I've straightened centerlinks with a hydraulic press. The tie rod end on the left side of the truck will have left hand threads on the rod ends and the right side will have right hand threads. This allows you to rotate the centerlink to adjust the toe in/out to specifications.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Be sure to count the number of turns it takes to remove each tie rod end as to allow the adjustments to be close when the new parts are reinstalled. I've straightened centerlinks with a hydraulic press. The tie rod end on the left side of the truck will have left hand threads on the rod ends and the right side will have right hand threads. This allows you to rotate the centerlink to adjust the toe in/out to specifications.

Rob

Do they come loose pretty easy? will I need heat? a fork and hammer? puller? Or is it hard to tell.

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Do they come loose pretty easy? will I need heat? a fork and hammer? puller? Or is it hard to tell.

Some come loose easily, some not so easy. Citing that your centerlink is bent I would remove both tie rod ends from their mountings at the same time and place the assembly in a bench vise to remove the rod ends. You may need a touch of heat if you cannot get them to budge any other way.

When putting the assembly back together use plenty of oil on the threads.

I'm assuming you know how to break the tie rod ends loose from the steering spindles?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Some come loose easily, some not so easy. Citing that your centerlink is bent I would remove both tie rod ends from their mountings at the same time and place the assembly in a bench vise to remove the rod ends. You may need a touch of heat if you cannot get them to budge any other way.

When putting the assembly back together use plenty of oil on the threads.

I'm assuming you know how to break the tie rod ends loose from the steering spindles?

Rob

I was referring to breaking them loose from the spindles! I have removed them (cars and light trucks) with a wedge fork, and with a puller, some have "fallen" out when I loosened the nut...just wondering what to expect...Is there a preferred/required method?

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I was referring to breaking them loose from the spindles! I have removed them (cars and light trucks) with a wedge fork, and with a puller, some have "fallen" out when I loosened the nut...just wondering what to expect...Is there a preferred/required method?

What I have used for years is a u-bolt nut with threads matching the tapered stud and a bolt threaded into the top of the nut. I then thread this "tool" onto the top of the ball joint stud, after the castle nut is removed, so that the bottom of the bolt is butted up against the stud on the ball joint and give it a few sharp cracks with a hammer. This prevents damage to the threads if the ball joint is to be reused and also prevents mushrooming the top of the stud.

"Mebbe I'm too ugly and stupid to give up!"

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What I have used for years is a u-bolt nut with threads matching the tapered stud and a bolt threaded into the top of the nut. I then thread this "tool" onto the top of the ball joint stud, after the castle nut is removed, so that the bottom of the bolt is butted up against the stud on the ball joint and give it a few sharp cracks with a hammer. This prevents damage to the threads if the ball joint is to be reused and also prevents mushrooming the top of the stud.

I've done that on cars several time through the years but typically I remove the cotter pin, unscrew the retaining nut several threads on the tapered stud, then hit the side of the spindle boss with a four pound sledge hammer smartly. They usually pop free with the first smack. Sometimes a second is required but nothing gets damaged. If you're under the truck, don't take the nut all the way off cause if that swinging SOB hits you when it comes loose it can hurt!! The nut will allow you to not damage threads but also keeps the rod end from falling free. Of course if you are replacing the rod ends, the threads don't much matter.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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