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Hancock FD

EN330 wheel cylinder

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The Hancock NH Fire Department's oldest engine is a 1945 Mack EN330 Type 45 and is in the process of a safety restoration.  Today we removed the front wheels and brake drums only to find the wheel cylinders rusted from lack of maintenance.  We've searched for part numbers for the front wheel cylinders but have had no luck.  Does anyone have that information?  We’d like to replace them with new but could clean, hone and fit new plunger rubbers once we remove them to measure the inside diameter.  Any help is most appreciated!

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9 minutes ago, Hancock FD said:

The Hancock NH Fire Department's oldest engine is a 1945 Mack EN330 Type 45 and is in the process of a safety restoration.  Today we removed the front wheels and brake drums only to find the wheel cylinders rusted from lack of maintenance.  We've searched for part numbers for the front wheel cylinders but have had no luck.  Does anyone have that information?  We’d like to replace them with new but could clean, hone and fit new plunger rubbers once we remove them to measure the inside diameter.  Any help is most appreciated!

There was a time when I could take the Mack 48SM wheel cylinder part numbers off the line sheet and then cross them in the Mack-to-Vendor book, or if necessary have Mack's specifications department cross them (perhaps by the fire truck expert Tony Hathaway himself), but those days sadly are in the past.

Particularly in antique vehicles, I learned to switch the system over to Motul so as to avoid this sad experience.

https://www.amazon.com/Motul-MTL100949-Factory-Percent-Synthetic/dp/B004LEYJO4/ref=sr_1_1?m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1544390090&sr=1-1&keywords=rbf600&refinements=p_6%3AATVPDKIKX0DER

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Usually there is a casting number but it sounds like the rust handled that already.  If you have a good parts shop with an "old guy" there is a chance of matching it up.  Back in the day many parts under Mack, Ford, Chevy etc were actually the same part.  If the physical casting dimensions match your OEM along with the bore dimension, you are good to go.

White Post Restoration can stainless line your original cylinders as an option.

https://whitepost.com/brake-sleeving-rebuilding-services/

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jhancock, thanks for the info.  We pulled the wheel cylinder off this morning and what a cruddy mess it was.  We cleaned everything up and found the parts almost new, no cylinder problems, even the rubbers were perfect.  While we scout for replacements, we'll refit the cleaned up cylinder and see how it works.  No leaks before cleanup, no leaks afterwards we hope.  We will keep looking for rebuild kits as the aluminum pistons show some inside corrosion.

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kscarbel2,  thanks for the Motul hint. We plan to flush the whole system once we can move the truck to get the exhaust system repaired and will try the Motul.

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24 minutes ago, Hancock FD said:

kscarbel2,  thanks for the Motul hint. We plan to flush the whole system once we can move the truck to get the exhaust system repaired and will try the Motul.

Your'e welcome. The synthetic brake fluids like Motul don't absorb moisture, and unlike the original synthetic brake fluids that the military used years ago are not spongy (pedal feel).

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