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I am currently completely rebuilding my rear brakes on my 69 R 600 . It has the pin on rear shoes with the cast aluminum shoes I had do do some looking to find new linings for the shoes and new bolts . The guy told me they are getting scarce and they were 250.00 per axle plus the bolts so I have 500.00 in just the linings I was surprised by the cost anyone have suggestions where I can purchase some for more realistic costing  ? Thanks 

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50 minutes ago, Mack man 1973 said:

imageproxy.php?img=&key=a8b8d98f5855eef7imageproxy.php?img=&key=a8b8d98f5855eef7I am currently completely rebuilding my rear brakes on my 69 R 600 . It has the pin on rear shoes with the cast aluminum shoes I had do do some looking to find new linings for the shoes and new bolts . The guy told me they are getting scarce and they were 250.00 per axle plus the bolts so I have 500.00 in just the linings I was surprised by the cost anyone have suggestions where I can purchase some for more realistic costing  ? Thanks 

I have the cast aluminum style on my B-673 and had them relined at about $350.00. You can however replace them with Rockwell "P" series shoes with little effort and they are much less expensive. My 72, 73, and 78 R models have the later style.

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1 hour ago, Rob said:

I have the cast aluminum style on my B-673 and had them relined at about $350.00. You can however replace them with Rockwell "P" series shoes with little effort and they are much less expensive. My 72, 73, and 78 R models have the later style.

When you say little effort, what is involved? I have cast aluminum shoes on my H67 and I will need to reline or replace.

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The shoes are the basic "P" design and they are easily replaced. You need to purchase the newer style hardware and rollers to retain the new style shoes.

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I picked up a set of liners and bolts for mine a few years ago, but never got around to putting them on. Truck drives around the yard with no shoes on one wheel, but it's just a yard truck.

We got them from Associated Truck Parts in Warminster PA, I'm sure they weren't 250, otherwise we wouldn't have gotten them.

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I had mine turn key installed and all inclusive with replacement hardware. They came back media blasted clean and epoxy coated in black. My uncle built up the cams and machined them back round as they were long obsolete. Also converted from the "rotochamber" to standard service and spring brake chambers but haven't put it back together yet. The truck remains on jack stands.

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I changed the spiders on my B613 and used newer style brakes. I think the spiders came off a 80 U model. im currently lookin for another pair so I to can change over the expensive bolt on lining on my 69 R600.

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Yea had I done it again I would have done the same just updated the whole brake system from the spyders out that would accept standard Q shoes 

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I think the reason of using aluminium pads was tp minimize the unsuspended weight. That might be actual for a hobby truck if planned to bobtail the most.

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My truck with aluminum shoes also has aluminum elephant pad housings. 38k rears, I believe.  Goes towards your theory of lighter unsuspended weight., But also towards lighter weight in general. Could just be experimentations and innovations to find ways to maximize payload.

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On 4/10/2019 at 1:53 AM, JoeH said:

My truck with aluminum shoes also has aluminum elephant pad housings. 38k rears, I believe.  Goes towards your theory of lighter unsuspended weight., But also towards lighter weight in general. Could just be experimentations and innovations to find ways to maximize payload.

Yes, that's sure for the same reason. I would expect the elephant ears (trunnion support brackets) made of aluminium also used on your truck.

The point is the relation of unsuspended mass to the suspended. As lower the figure as softer the ride (less hits, vibration etc). So for a hobby reason (no worry for the total weight) both is good to minimize unsuspended mass or to increase the suspended.

Quite funny when someone comes to my place and see truck parts he use to talk how to make better one thing or another. And sometimes when I ask why it's better the answer is "It's lighter". Than you observe quite funny reaction when my words are "The heavier is better"

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