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robert pinto

b61 wanted

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im currently looking for a b model single axle for sale. i am looking at one for sale right now but it has an air clutch and air split shift. i heard these had alot of problems. gentleman that is selling it says theres no issues. should i stay away. can they be made to work well or clutch be easily replaced.

 

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My white cabover had a air clutch and it was somewhat touchy. I never used it to shift gears just to take off and you wanted to use 1st gear bobtail or loaded good luck

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Wonder why a B model would have air clutch?  Something unique about the truck?  Right hand drive?

Edited by Freightrain

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My B65 has an air-clutch and uni-shift 10sp. It was an old Mason-Dixon fleet tractor. All I can say is that it works!

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5 minutes ago, wingman said:

My B65 has an air-clutch and uni-shift 10sp. It was an old Mason-Dixon fleet tractor. All I can say is that it works!

If you could post up a couple photos of the air clutch setup as I've never seen one.

Thanks,

Rob

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I'll try at some point here when I can. You can only see it from underneath. It is fairly complicated and looks not easy to repair if something goes wrong. It's one of my trucks waiting to be fixed-up and sitting in my barn, and is not on the top of my list to work on yet!

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I understand fully. The way conventional B series clutch linkage runs I can't imagine how they would route an air cylinder unless there is additional linkage involved. Standard B series clutches, (push type) really don't take much effort so never realized air assist was an option. I see no reference to it in my 1965 TS-442 service manual either. 

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Is the air clutch, air actuated or air assist?

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On my white it had an air brake peddle on the floor and run a hose to a slave cylinder pushing on the clutch arm. It was 30 some years ago so i hope i remember it right.

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Interesting.  I agree, the clutch linkage on a B is simple enough, reliable and not heavy at all.  Why would they want to put an air cylinder on it?  I just assumed maybe for an Aussie RH drive or something with a real weird engine/trans combination.  I know it is more common on early COE.

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I have a 59 B61 single axle with a twin stick 9 speed. Minimal rust for 2500

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only air assist clutches i have ever seen on B models were on Monoshifts and unishifts and yes they were complicated looking. seen them on both 67 and 72 series transmissions

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It is an air-assist because you can still push the clutch in with no air built-up, but with more effort. It does have a unishift 10sp. When I get to restoring it, I will have to find another shift knob because the one on it doesn't work. I'm nor sure if I could just put a external air splitter on it like the eatons have. It will be awhile before I get to it because of other projects higher on the list. It runs buts has a bad piston(the guy I got it from was ether happy). I got the parts to fix it and another engine if need be.

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