Jump to content
kscarbel2

What is wrong with people today?

Recommended Posts

BBC  /  August 17, 2018

The bodies of missing Colorado mother Shanann Watts and her two daughters have been located inside a fuel tank days after they vanished.

Her husband Chris Watts has been arrested on suspicion of murdering his entire family. His arrest came one day after he appealed for their return.

The tanks were nearly full when Mr Watts hid their bodies there to conceal the odor.

The couple had financial troubles, and she suspected her husband was cheating.

Mrs Watts, 34, who was 15 weeks pregnant, and the couple's children Bella, four, and Celeste, three, went missing on Monday.

The bodies were found inside oil and gas tanks on the premises of a petroleum company where Mr Watts worked.

He was fired from the company - Anadarko Petroleum - on Wednesday after his arrest.

Mr Watts is being held on suspicion of three counts of murder and tampering with evidence.

Police have until Monday to press charges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Hobert62 said:
My oldest son watches football on tv and and both kids play.   They are 9&11.  I told them both if I ever saw them take a knee during the national anthem at one of their games I personally would go on the field and stand them up. When my little sister got deployed to Iraq it defiantly hit home and change the way I think about things.    
Thank you to those that have served.    


And to think that snatch was trying to be president,,,,like wow man....I was a raider and giants fan now I spend my Sunday’s outside during football season ...bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ernest Borgnine explains at 1:38 how compulsory military service creates more well-rounded people.

.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kscarbel2 said:
Ernest Borgnine explains at 1:38 how compulsory military service creates more well-rounded people.
.
 


That was excellent thanks for sharing he was a very good man...bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, mowerman said:


That was excellent thanks for sharing he was a very good man...bob

U.S. Naval Institute Blog  /  July 9, 2012

He won a Best Actor Oscar for his performance in Marty (1955). And his many screen roles include Sergeant “Fatso” Judson in From Here to Eternity (1953), General Worden in The Dirty Dozen (1967), and Dutch Engstrom in The Wild Bunch (1969). But he is perhaps best remembered as Lieutenant Commander Quinton McHale, the title character in television’s madcap sitcom, “McHale’s Navy” (1962-66). The congenial “real McHale” talked recently about his decade in the U.S. Navy and his film work with Naval History Editor Fred L. Schultz.

Naval History: What made you decide to enlist in the Navy rather than any of the other services?

Borgnine: I’m what you call a Depression sailor. I got a job immediately after leaving high school; I was lucky—three dollars a week and all I could eat, working on a vegetable truck. I had never thought of it as a career, but that was all I could find in those days. You were lucky to get off the streets. One day while riding on the truck, I saw a sign that said: “Join the Navy, See the World.” So I went to the recruiter, unbeknownst to my mother and dad, and said I’d like to join the Navy. They put me on a waiting list and asked if I’d be ready to come when they called. I said, “Absolutely!” So I got the call and, believe it or not, got in on another fellow’s case of the piles. He failed, and I made it. I believe at that time only 11 or 12 of us made it out of 12,000; that many people were ready to go into the service, simply because they wanted to get off the streets. It wasn’t that we were bums. We just wanted to help our families, as I did, and also wanted to get out there and learn something.

So I joined the Navy and went to the Newport, Rhode Island, Training Station in September of 1935. It was a whole new experience. I’ll never forget the advice my dad gave me the morning I left. He said, “You know, son, you’re not going to be tied down by your mother’s apron strings any more.” He said, “You’re going to have to go out and do it on your own.”

I remember one day—I still get a little choked up about it—I was on board a ship, the four-stacker destroyer Lamberton (DD-119), and the crew was celebrating Mother’s Day by listening to a program about it on the radio. That hit me in such a way that I sat under a ladder and cried. You can’t imagine how hard I cried. And after it was over, I suddenly realized I had cut the apron strings. But it made a man out of me. And I have never regretted one day, not ever.

Naval History: What was your most memorable experience in the Navy?

Borgnine: I’ll never forget the day in San Diego I was put in charge of the captain’s gig. I polished that thing until it gleamed. And then word came that we were going to take the captain ashore. Well, I brought the gig alongside smartly, with my engineer down below, handling the controls. I put one foot on the gangway and one foot holding the boat. The captain came on board and said, “128th Street Landing!” I said, “Yes, sir!” and started to push off. As I pushed, my foot slipped on the deck of the boat, because I had polished it to such a high degree. My other foot slipped off the gangway, and I went straight down into the water, between the boat and the gangway—straight down. Then I came straight back up. As I was getting my hat back on my head, he looked down at me and said, “No, 128th Street!”

That was in the Lamberton, when we were towing target ships. I remember one day, instead of firing at the targets, somehow or other one plane miscalculated and began firing at us. You could hear the shots whistling between the stacks. And the only thing that saved us was the chief radioman, who got on the radio and told the pilot to stop. I also remember vividly having to go out and resurface some of the tows. Sometimes they’d turn over, and we would have to go and try to turn them back up again.

At that time the Navy didn’t want you to get your feet wet, so they would put boots on you—not small boots, but big hip boots. I said, “Wait a minute. If those boots fill up with water, we’re going to sink like lead.” We were informed that this was the way the Navy was going to do it. Well, the first chance we got, we cast them off, threw them away.

We also towed paravanes for mine-sweeping. That was a risky job, because paravane wire could cut metal. It was really something to watch those things work. Unfortunately, on another ship one time, the wire broke as an ensign was straddling it and cut him right in half.

Naval History: What was the biggest difference between the four-stacker destroyer and the converted yacht you served in during the war?

Borgnine: The yacht, the Sylph (PY-12), had been owned by old man Murphy, who made Murphy Beds—the ones that folded out of the wall. I had my own private stateroom. I was a first-class gunner’s mate, but the captain used to knock on my door before entering. Talk about having it made! We really did.

Of course, we weren’t supposed to bring booze aboard, but in this certain ship, it seemed we always got our share. How? Several of us would go ashore at night and buy milk. We would then paint the bottles white and fill them up with booze. When we came back, the watch officer would meet us at the gangway and ask, “What do you have there, men?” We would say, “Milk, sir, and hamburgers. Would you like one?” He’d let us by and we’d go down below and get roaring. Talk about “McHale’s Navy,” this was it!

So there was all the difference in the world. The destroyer was a fighting ship, built for war. The Sylph was a fighting ship, too, but there weren’t very many things that you could do with a yacht. We had a 3-inch/50-caliber gun that we were afraid to shoot because of the wooden decks. We also had six .30-caliber air-cooled Brownings, but they were like mosquito bites against the skin of a submarine. We had a Y-gun to shoot off the depth charges because we couldn’t go fast enough to let them roll off the stern if we met up with a submarine.

Naval History: Did you ever encounter any U-boats?

Borgnine: Yes, we did. We met up with one, and according to the skipper, we had him dead to rights. We were guarding an oiler, and he was going like crazy. We just couldn’t keep up. Our propulsion was sufficient just for going in and out of harbors slowly. But there we were, out to sea, trying to keep up; but we just couldn’t. That day, we did manage to snag onto a German submarine; there were a lot of them out there. We were like sitting ducks, though. Only three ships were guarding the entire Atlantic coastline when the war started. The others were the Zircon (PY-16) and the Sapphire (PYC-2).

When we made contact with the U-boat, the old man said, “Gunner, when I blow the whistle, you let that Y-gun go.” I said, “Yes, sir!” So we got all set, and he blew the whistle. I pulled the lanyard, and boom! Off she went. Everybody said, “ooh and ahh” as they watched the things go. It was the first time they had ever heard an explosion. I started kicking them in the behind, saying, “Come on, come on! Get it reloaded!” And we’d load it up again, pull the lanyard, and off she’d go. The whole time, I was listening for detonations—there were no detonations. We shot off 20 depth charges—no detonations. Finally one did go off.

I was standing there with the lanyards in my hand and said to myself, “I know I set them right—75 feet, just what the skipper ordered.” Because they didn’t go off, I could envision my carcass hanging from the yardarm. Believe me, I was scared stiff. Well, we came back into port, and sailors came aboard and started taking off the depth charges, when one fellow said, “You got a chippin’ hammer, gunner?” I said, “Yeah, I got a chippin’ hammer.” We took off about 147 coats of paint from one of the depth charges, and it said, right there on a nice little brass plaque: “Manufactured in 1917.” That’s how we went to war.

Naval History: What is the difference between your Navy and the Navy of today?

Borgnine: I’ve been to a number of places and seen for myself the caliber of people who are in the Navy today—in all the services for that matter. This is an altogether different bunch. These people of today are really bright, young, good people.

We had bright young men in our day, too, but we did not have the equipment they have today, either. Even radar was unheard of when I first went into the service. Then suddenly, they started putting bedsprings up on the tops of ships. We wondered what the devil they were doing, as these great big bedsprings were rolling around. We wondered what they did. Finally, the word came out: “It’s a secret. These can pick up and find all sorts of things floating through the air.” I said, “Come on, you’re crazy. Nothing can do that.” But they did!

Naval History: What experiences from the Navy did you borrow for some of your screen roles?

Borgnine: I had occasion once to make a picture called The Vikings (1958). The Navy stood me in good stead at that time, because, unbeknownst to anyone, I had pulled a bow oar in my whaleboat crew on the Lamberton. That’s one of the hardest places in the boat to pull an oar, because you’re sitting up forward and you’re almost a down-stroke. It was tough.

When we went to Norway to shoot this picture, the very first thing they asked me to do was to go out on the boat. I was dressed up in my civilian clothes, but I jumped right in. We were pulling 14-foot oars and going along pretty good. Then, up went the beat, a little higher, a little more. Well, when we finished, I had impressed the rest of the fellows there so much that they would have killed for me, because I proved I was one of them. I became their man. It was marvelous, thanks to the Navy for having me pull that bow oar in the whaleboat.

I’ll tell you what I did with “McHale’s Navy.” I wanted to do everything that I couldn’t do in the real Navy—like ski behind my ship. I did everything that you could possibly imagine, while always maintaining a good rapport with my troops. I made up my mind I was going to run this navy the right way. You see, Quinton McHale had been captain of his own tramp steamer before the war. Nobody knew this, of course, but it was written in the screenplay before we started. And they don’t reveal that in the show. As an old tramp steamer captain, McHale was a lieutenant commander in the Naval Reserve, so when the war started, naturally he went into the Navy. They had no other place for him, except to put him in a PT-boat.

I wanted to continue “McHale’s Navy” as a series and had some people at Universal interested in it, too. My idea was to have him wandering around New York after the war, when suddenly he hears, “Hey, skip!” from one of his old sailors. They eventually get the whole crew back together and seek out McHale’s old ship, which is owned by a woman who turns out to be another Captain Binghamton [played by Joe Flynn in the original series]. McHale becomes the skipper of the ship, which carries passengers but turns out to be a spy ship for the CIA. Universal said, “Let’s do it!” But nothing ever happened, and they let it go by the board. But it was fun to think about, and I thought it could have made a heck of a good series.

Naval History: Nothing ever came of it?

Borgnine: The man at Universal said, “This is the best thing I’ve seen since cut bread.” But he never did a thing.

Naval History: So it’s written down somewhere?

Borgnine: Oh sure, I have it at home, all written down. It would probably have made a good picture, too.

Naval History: Do you think the Navy might be a little better off today if it had more McHales and fewer Binghamtons?

Borgnine: Absolutely. But I don’t think too many Binghamtons are around anymore. The Navy has changed a great deal. Not that the officers of my day were bad, because I served under a lot of good officers, believe me. But there were a few bad ones, too.

I remember one gentleman, a lieutenant commander, when I first reported to the Sylph. He was captain of the ship. The morning I was brought to him to be introduced, he was still in bed, in his cabin. The fellow who brought me down knocked on his door and said, “I have the new gunner’s mate aboard.” The captain opened the door, and he had his hand underneath his pillow. I thought that was odd, and I said, “Good morning, Captain. How are you, sir? I’m reporting aboard for duty.” As we left, he made a move, and I saw that his hand was holding a pistol. Very odd, indeed.

Now, this gentleman used to have the hardest time docking that yacht that you ever saw in your life. The tugboat captain in New York would come down and watch him land, just for the laughs. Two of our fellows always came up out of the engine room to watch, too. One chief carpenter’s mate on board hated this captain. And every time he went ashore, he’d get drunk and abusive, come back to the ship, and yell down the pipe: “You no good so and so!” He kept on putting in chits for a transfer and finally got one. Two weeks later, the captain got one, too—to the same ship. As I understand it, they went to a huge transport ship that was getting ready to go overseas to Britain. Just before they took off, this carpenter’s mate threw his sea bag over the side and followed it. He said, “I’m damned if I’m going with you.” I heard later that the ship and all hands were lost in a 100-mile-an-hour hurricane off Nova Scotia.

Naval History: How do you think “McHale’s Navy” would play on TV today?

Borgnine: Are you kidding? People love it. It’s always playing somewhere in the world. Universal owns it, so it plays only occasionally in this country. They’ll put out shows like “Gilligan’s Island,” but they hold off on “McHale.” On Labor Day in Oakland, California, they had a big “McHale” to-do, and it went over tremendously well. It’s crazy, but I’ve had people come up to me and say, “You know, Mr. Borgnine, you’re the best baby-sitter in the world.” I say, “How do you figure that?” And they say, “When our children are watching ‘McHale’s Navy,’ we always know where they are.”

Naval History: What was the better duty station—Taratupa or Voltafiore?

Borgnine: Actually, I didn’t want “McHale’s Navy” to move to Italy. Our producer had tried to do it with “Sergeant Bilko,” but the Bilko people said they didn’t want to go to Italy. So he took it out on us, and we went to Voltafiore. Unfortunately, it didn’t last very long. I think the show could still be going if it had been left on Taratupa.

I’ll tell you something. Secretary of the Navy [John] Warner called me one time when I was in Washington. He wanted to see me. He said, “I want to tell you, Mr. Borgnine, that you have done more for the U.S. Navy with ‘McHale’s Navy’ than I’ve ever seen any recruiter do. People want to come into the Navy just to join McHale’s Navy.” That was quite a tribute to me and my troupe.

Naval History: What was a typical day of shooting like on the “McHale’s Navy” set?

Borgnine: We had a lot of fun doing it. In those days we used to start, anxiously, at eight o’clock in the morning. Well, by a quarter of eight, we were ready to go, all hands. And I guess we broke the mold, because now they start shooting at six-thirty. By noontime, we would have at least 12 to 14 pages of dialogue and action in the can. Then we’d take it easy, laze around, blow up a few fireworks, and scare a few tourists coming through.

Naval History: Do you keep in touch with the old cast?

Borgnine: Oh, sure. A few of them have died, you know. But I see Tim Conway [Ensign Charles Parker], and Carl Ballantine [Torpedoman Lester Gruber] is still around. He’s older than the hills, but he’s still around.

Naval History: How would you rate Hollywood’s portrayal of the military in general, and the Navy in particular, past and present?

Borgnine: I’ve found that in the past they were quite good. Of course they always took liberties. They had to put in the love interest and how it affected the man in his work and all that pertained to it. The majority of the time, though, they were quite good. We had a naval advisor on “McHale’s Navy.” After the first day of shooting, he said, “Ernie, what the devil are they shooting here?” I told him it was “McHale’s Navy.” He went storming off and said, “Don’t call us, we’ll call you.” He really left us in the lurch. He wouldn’t have anything to do with us, because we weren’t portraying the real Navy, his Navy. Then, the show suddenly began to blossom, and he started bringing people around to show them his “McHale’s Navy.” From that point, the Navy began treating us well.

Naval History: Do you think today’s films on military subjects may suffer a bit because fewer film makers actually served in the military?

Borgnine: Definitely, yes. There is always something lacking. But they try to get it as best they can.

Naval History: What were some good naval-oriented films?

Borgnine: Away All Boats (1956) was a pretty good naval picture. And I did a submariner picture with Glenn Ford [Torpedo Run (1958)] that was quite good. One thing we found while making that picture is that you can’t go horizontally with a Momsen Lung (an early underwater breathing device). You have to go vertically, straight up, or straight down. And they wanted us to go horizontally because of the camera angle. You can’t do it. You’ll fill up with water.

Naval History: We hear a lot today about too much violence on television and the movies. As one of the stars of The Wild Bunch, which came in for some criticism to that effect, where do you think we should we draw the line?

Borgnine: They asked the same question in Jamaica when the picture was first shown. And I kind of got up on my high horse, because if ever anyone knew the West, it was [director] Sam Peckinpah. He told it like he saw it and like he knew it. Of course, he hadn’t been alive in the days of the Old West, but based on what he had worked on and knew from past experience and reading, this was a hard, hard time. If you didn’t keep your wits about you, you were dead. It was that kind of a violence. And he tried to show the violence. What I said at the time was, “Would you rather have the violence on your screen, or would you rather see it on your city streets?” The key lies in the people who do not teach their children properly by saying, “Look, this is a violent picture, and it’s violent because man is violent, and people do violent things to other people. This is what you must not do.” But people don’t train their children that way anymore.

Naval History: So you’re saying it’s not the fault of movies and TV—it’s the parents’ fault?

Borgnine: Partly. It’s also the fact that they’ll do and redo anything that sells on TV or in the motion pictures. So we have rape, violence, explosions, and everything else, and kids sit back and say, “Man, isn’t that great? It must be, because we see it so often.” But is it? It sells. That’s the thing. And as long as it sells, they’re going to do it. I thought that The Wild Bunch, which later went on to become a classic, was done in a way that showed the terribleness of the situation, what these men lived through and died for—which was no good, because they died. Period.

Naval History: How important is history?

Borgnine: Very important, I think. They say history repeats itself. I think everybody should know their history. Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t. I had a line in a show I was doing not too long ago. I was to say, “I was playing tennis in Corregidor,” and so on. I had a college graduate come up to me and ask, “Ernie, what’s a Corregidor?”

.

.

Photo 6.jpg

Photo 5.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a p.o.s. named Jonchuk,who threw his five year old daughter off a bridge into Tampa bay a couple years ago to her death a local deputy witnessed it, he's finally being "tried" he will probably get life,due to his "mental illness" on our nickel....or 15 years of appeals if he gets the death penalty! When most of us were children and young adults you never heard of anyone raping a baby w.t.f. has gone wrong?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cultural decay and declining standards of behavior in these United States

A scumbag (Charles Alton Stratton Jr) steals purses from elderly women......and then drives over them.

An obese mini-van driver does nothing more than look at the obviously injured elderly woman on the ground.

If I was king for a day, I would first of all order Mr. Stratton to be tied to the ground and driven over with his own RAV4 (an eye for an eye). Then I would liquidate his property including the car to reimburse the government (the American taxpayer) for his handling to our new penal colony.

.

 

Photo 2.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kscarbel2 said:

Cultural decay and declining standards of behavior in these United States

A scumbag (Charles Alton Stratton Jr) steals purses from elderly women......and then drives over them.

An obese mini-van driver does nothing more than look at the obviously injured elderly woman on the ground.

If I was king for a day, I would first of all order Mr. Stratton to be tied to the ground and driven over with his own RAV4 (an eye for an eye). Then I would liquidate his property including the car to reimburse the government (the American taxpayer) for his handling to our new penal colony.

.

 

And according to the news $7.57 was his take.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Screwy...

Woman was targeted for having her purse visible to the window, at right hip.  

Guy parks cock-eyed in a disabled spot and leaves an older woman in the vehicle.

Does not hesitate to study.

Walks right through two obvious cameras zones and exposes his face. 

Little old Mrs. Stratton gives the good-score nod?

McBig Mack brotherman sure seems to be holding his camera sideways like he is taking a pic of the victim?????? Then returns to vehicle?

Yup, I’m getting an extended mag. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Not heinous as most of the content. Maybe more along the lines of unethical good'ol'boy'ism…. I dig his excuse, lol.

 

In the only tournament I've fished judges took a DNA sample of the winners and match it to the Lake DNA strand, be pretty hard pull a cheat. When they are dangling a $16,000 Ice Castle for a prize they have to be paranoid.  

 

Wisconsin Anglers Convicted of Cheating in Fishing Tournament

By Walker Smith Nov 28, 2018
 
 
 
 
cefalu.jpg
State appeals court upholds fishing guide Michael Cefalu's felony fraud conviction. 

A judge has properly convicted a fishing guide for helping his client cheat in a Wisconsin salmon fishing tournament, a state appeals court ruled Tuesday. Guide Michael Cefalu took Orylynn Helt fishing during the Kewaunee/Door Salmon Tournament back in 2013. They were fishing for a prize of $10,000 cash and nearly $1,500 in various merchandise. 

The client, Helt, weighed in a 30.27-pound Chinook salmon at the tournament scales. The tournament director scanned the fish with a metal detector, which alerted him to the presence of metal inside of the salmon. Cefalu, the guide, was instructed to cut the fish open but he became evasive and told the tournament director he planned on mounting the fish. Eventually, he obliged and a 1-pound weight was found in the salmon's throat. 

Cefalu's excuse wasn't believable to anyone: The 30-year captain claimed the fish must have sucked the weight off the bottom of Lake Michigan.:clap::pat:

Orylynn Helt was charged with misdemeanor attempted theft by fraud and was ordered to pay a $1,000 fine. Cefalu was ultimately charged with felony attempted theft by fraud, of property worth between $5,000 and $10,000. He was also ordered to pay a $2,500 fine. 
 
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Five people dead in SunTrust Bank shooting in Florida

BBC  /  January 24, 2019

Gunman kills every customer in Florida bank

Officers responded after a man called police from inside the SunTrust bank in the town of Sebring and said: "I have shot five people".

The gunman - Zephen Xaver, 21 - had barricaded himself in the branch, forced people to lie on the floor and began shooting, according to police.

He surrendered after officers stormed the bank. The motive for the shooting remains unclear.

The incident took place just after 12:30 (17:30 GMT) at SunTrust Bank in Sebring, about 80 miles (130km) south of Orlando. Police say they were the only five people in the bank at the time.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said, “Obviously this is an individual that needs to face very swift and exacting justice.”

.

Photo 5.jpg

Photo 4a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikolas Cruz murdered 17 students, and has yet to be executed.

Now this young man murdered all five customers in the bank.....and nothing will come of it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

something is seriously wrong with this. the article says this happened at 12:30 today. 

and was posted 2 hours ago. ....but it is only 12:25.

so this was reported 2 hours before it took place. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, tjc transport said:

something is seriously wrong with this. the article says this happened at 12:30 today. 

and was posted 2 hours ago. ....but it is only 12:25.

so this was reported 2 hours before it took place. 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-46981092

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Associated Press  /  February 9, 2019

Five underage suspects were arrested Friday and charged with criminal homicide for the murder of Kyle Yorlets. 

Three of the five suspects arrested Friday in connection with Yorlets' murder were named by police as Roniyah McKnight, 14, Decorrius Wright, 16, and Diamond Lewis, 15.

The names of the two youngest suspects, a 12-year-old girl and 13-year-old boy, have been withheld because of their age 

According to the Metropolitan Nashville Police, the five kids were in a stolen Chevrolet Colorado pickup truck in the alley that runs behind Yorlets' house in the 32000 block of Torbertt Street when they spotted him outside on Thursday afternoon.

The minors accosted the man, took his wallet and demanded the keys to his car, which he refused to hand over, prompting the suspects to open fire on him.

The mortally-wounded victim managed to make it inside his home, where he was found by one of his roommates at 3pm. 

Yorlets was rushed to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead from his injuries.

In the hours after the shooting, officers recovered the stolen Chevy Colorado, which had been abandoned in the 1600 block of Timberland Drive.

Witnesses in the area reported seeing three juveniles get out of the vehicle. Two of them got into another car and drove off, while the third fled on foot.

Police said in the course of the investigation, they learned that the underage suspects had traveled to the West Nashville Walmart on Charlotte Pike, where all five suspects were apprehended.

A loaded 9mm pistol, which had been reported stolen, was recovered from them. A second loaded, stolen pistol was recovered from inside the store.

The vehicle in which they traveled to the Walmart, a Hyundai Santa Fe, was also stolen. 

.

Photo 2.jpg

Photo 3.jpg

Photo 4.jpg

Photo 4a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What has happened to the America I used to know ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, kscarbel2 said:

What has happened to the America I used to know ?

Indoctrination instead of education, being  a minority you are owned for the oppression and lack of opportunity but mainly lack of parental guidance because their parent(s) are only slightly older than them. .

Edited by 41chevy
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, 41chevy said:

Indoctrination instead of education, being  a minority you are owned for the oppression and lack of opportunity but mainly lack of parental guidance because their parent(s) are only slightly older than them. .

Paul, I'll say it again......"Cultural decay and declining standards of behavior".

The government is the only entity tall enough to lead society in a healthy direction, but Eisenhower was the last respectable president actively doing it. So now, decades later, we have this.

Maybe they're from Detroit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kscarbel2 said:

Paul, I'll say it again......"Cultural decay and declining standards of behavior".

The government is the only entity tall enough to lead society in a healthy direction, but Eisenhower was the last respectable president actively doing it. So now, decades later, we have this.

Maybe they're from Detroit.

Nashville, Tenn.

As for a healthy direction, first you need a "healthy government" something I do not see returning. Sadly  I fear the divide is only going to get much, much worse.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrew King, CNN  /  February 18, 2019

US airline passengers who don't identify as "male" or "female" [???] will soon have more gender options to choose when booking tickets.

The new gender options to be added include "unspecified" and "undisclosed." [???]

Airlines for America (A4A), the industry trade group, made the announcement that A4A and International Air Transport Association members recently approved a new international standard for “non-binary passengers” effective June 1. [???]

"U.S. airlines value a culture of diversity and inclusion, both in the workplace and for our passengers, and we work hard each day to accommodate the needs of all travelers, while delivering a safe, secure and enjoyable flight experience," Airlines for America said in a statement.

Major airlines are making the additions to be more inclusive for diverse passengers and the news is being praised by advocacy groups.

"NCTE applauds the A4A for adding gender options that are reflective of the diversity of their passengers," Arli Christian spokesperson for “The National Center for Transgender Equality” said in a statement.

"Non-binary people face unnecessary, invasive, and discriminatory scrutiny by airlines,airports, and security services alike. A4A's work is in line with other states who offer gender neutral designations on IDs and is an important step toward ensuring safe and smooth travel for all passengers regardless of their gender."

These additions come as many states are adding more gender options on identification cards and birth certificates.

Last month, a new law in New York City made it easier for transgender and non-binary New Yorkers to match their birth certificate to their gender identity without needing a signed affidavit from a healthcare provider.

In 2017, Washington, D.C. issued the nation's first gender-neutral driver's licenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have no morals. They didn't have to fear the belt. They get trophies for participating in sports.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most schools are getting rid of the class ranking system for graduating seniors.

In the policy, numerical class ranks will no longer be calculated and there won't be valedictorians or salutatorians.

Rather than raising the bar for our students, they are lowering it.

Everybody’s a winner……even when they didn’t study hard and aren’t.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that many school systems have begun using symbols like check marks and plus signs instead of actual letter grades, but so far it’s most been only in Elementary schools. It’s still ridiculous either way. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I gather schools and universities will now have a check with a plus or minus instead of a GPA so no body gets "embarrassed" by being on the bottom or top of their class or the stigma of being under or over qualified for their career choice.  Hope with their diplomas they also get a "safe zone"kit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Welcome to BMT!

...The world's best antique, classic & modern Mack Truck support forum! Founded in 2000, BigMackTrucks.com is the place to go for everything related to Mack Trucks!

BMT!

BigMackTrucks.com is owned and operated by Watt's Truck Center, New Alexandria, PA. This forum and it's contents are not affiliated with Mack Trucks, Inc. or Volvo Trucks North America.

×