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j hancock

WHAT IS THAT SMELL!

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How many months of cover do you get in a winter? We are Last week November till third week March. Frost break ends around late April.

Edited by Mack Technician

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5 hours ago, j hancock said:
5 hours ago, j hancock said:

Front tires got a groove for added steering side bite and the rear got a groove for traction.

 

Jim, Next time l need tires cut for my Garden Tractor pullers l'll know who to call!   Hippy...........

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Have gun, will travel.

 

Hmmmm...... you might want to find someone who knows what they are doing with it!

Tire Groover.JPG

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16 hours ago, Mack Technician said:

How many months of cover do you get in a winter? We are Last week November till third week March. Frost break ends around late April.

Our season is typically a little shorter than that.   Probably on average we get snow cover middle to late Dec.  I would say we average around 58-60 inches of snowfall.

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If you slip with that tractor, you have got some serious snow! We took our kids out to Yosemite about 10 years ago. It was early June and when we came in from the east, they still had 5' of snow along the road.

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Nice. I assume you have loaded tires. I also use wheel weights as well as filled tires on my Kubota L4660 and it does seem to help with traction.

 

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 The rear tires are loaded and if my math is correct, I have about 500 lbs, of concrete for the 3 pt hitch.

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I have my Ferguson's tires filled with ballast. When it finishes rusting out the set of rims on it I'm going to buy a new pair and use beet  juice instead of chloride. 

Edited by HeavyGunner
Damn autocorrect
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Mine supposedly has beet juice or something non corrosive in the rears.  Two years ago my father did the tires, tubes and rim routine on his John Deere because of calcium chloride and dry rotted rubber.

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I knew they filled tractor tires with something other than air, but never knew what it was! Don't get a flat til your rims rust out huh? I remember in the 50s regrooving tires was popular both on trucks and cars! There were companies much later than that who would "sipe" your truck tires for better traction in rain or ice! I used to drive an AC Delco battery truck in the 80s. They were a single axle day cab GMC with a beverage trailer with roll up doors.We hauled auto and commercial batteries in a 31 ft single axle trailer, we very seldom were loaded to capacity, and the things were just awful in rain or ice! We tried to get the leasing company ( Ryder) to sipe our tires but they never did!

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When I started 10 years ago at the place I work we had our own siping machine and siped all of our steer tires. Made a difference, especially on our trains. 

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1 hour ago, j hancock said:

Mine supposedly has beet juice or something non corrosive in the rears.  Two years ago my father did the tires, tubes and rim routine on his John Deere because of calcium chloride and dry rotted rubber.

Pennsylvania started using a beet juice formulated brine to dump on the roads in the winter ahead of storms......And the shit is murderously corrosive. 

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46 minutes ago, 1958 F.W.D. said:

Pennsylvania started using a beet juice formulated brine to dump on the roads in the winter ahead of storms......And the shit is murderously corrosive. 

The Rim Guard site says their sugar beet juice is non-corrosive.   After 12 years, there is no rust on my rims.  

Maybe there is other nasty stuff in PENNDOT's brine solution?  IDK?

http://www.rimguard.biz/

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PENNDOT and other states still use calcium chloride or mag chloride for deicing.  Beet juice is used to make the salt stick to the road surface, vehicles, etc.  Beet juice by itself will not melt snow/ice.

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1 hour ago, farmer52 said:

PENNDOT and other states still use calcium chloride or mag chloride for deicing.  Beet juice is used to make the salt stick to the road surface, vehicles, etc.  Beet juice by itself will not melt snow/ice.

Ahhhhhh OK I have been led to believe the beet juice was the corrosive content of the brine. 

 

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13 hours ago, farmer52 said:

PENNDOT and other states still use calcium chloride or mag chloride for deicing.  Beet juice is used to make the salt stick to the road surface, vehicles, etc.  Beet juice by itself will not melt snow/ice.

Hi Ken, Thanks for the clarification.

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I knew they filled tractor tires with something other than air, but never knew what it was! Don't get a flat til your rims rust out huh? I remember in the 50s regrooving tires was popular both on trucks and cars! There were companies much later than that who would "sipe" your truck tires for better traction in rain or ice! I used to drive an AC Delco battery truck in the 80s. They were a single axle day cab GMC with a beverage trailer with roll up doors.We hauled auto and commercial batteries in a 31 ft single axle trailer, we very seldom were loaded to capacity, and the things were just awful in rain or ice! We tried to get the leasing company ( Ryder) to sipe our tires but they never did!

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Isn't beet juice water based? You would think the oxygen in the water would rust( oxidize) the wheels? Maybe the beet ingredient absorbs the oxygen.Anybody know? 

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It's just juice from beets so yes it's water based with a high sugar content which keeps it from freezing. 

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I don't think anyone is still using any corrosive liquids to fill tires. 

On 9/15/2017 at 3:52 PM, j hancock said:

 The rear tires are loaded and if my math is correct, I have about 500 lbs, of concrete for the 3 pt hitch.

The only problem with a weight box is it tends to diminish the front wheel traction by lifting it, but it does increase overall traction on the rear wheels. I use a weight box on my BX because I was just too cheap to buy wheel weights and I don't fill the tires since it's main job is cutting grass and I don't want the extra weight on the lawn.

What really made a difference for me was placing the blade directly on the tractor instead of placing it on the loader bucket. The loader made it so long that the blade became a lever that just pushed the tractor around. Every time I stopped in slick conditions the tractor would just slide side to side instead of moving forward until I lifted the blade. I found it pretty hard to plow snow with the blade up in the air, so I had to make a change to my set up.

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You are correct on all counts.  I do have a couple of situations where the plow on the loader arms allow me push snow up and over permanent obstacles which helps gets rid of quite a bit of snow.  Also, I have to swap to the bucket occasionally.  A chassis mounted blade would be more efficient in plowing only so hopefully the new front tire grooves will help counteract the lever effect of the loader arms.

The concrete was only added to the fleet last year and it did help with traction a little.  The other eleven years had nothing on the 3 pt hitch.  I had been toying with grooving the tires before but didn't want to jump in.  It may be such that with the tires sharpened up now, I might be able to leave the concrete off?

I am going to keep tinkering with it to make it as balanced an operation as possible.

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