mowerman

long awaited work shop finally started

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Freightrain    1,701

Kinda like the roads.  I never knew that Ohio had the only lasers in the world that have an arc built into them.   It has to, I've never seen so many roads/bridges that don't line up.  Damn near throw you out of the seat when you hit the crater between the two.

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Freightrain    1,701

I was in Mississippi last week for a day(long day).  I couldn't believe how bad the roads were in Memphis(flew in and drove south).  Would have really had a bad trip if I had to drive the old Mack down there!!!  Once on 78 going into MS the roads were nice.

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fxfymn    1,095
On 9/11/2017 at 3:22 PM, 41chevy said:

Our houses main section in Virginia was built in 1848, an addition doubled the size in 1929 with a living room, bakery and solarium. In 1946 a big  kitchen, pantry, laundry room, attached 3 car garage with a 6 room apartment over the garage was added in 1946.The oldest part in the most level and true. The newer the additions the less they leveled and measured. Biggest issue was a brass pipe in the wall by one of the fir places with a stick jammed in it. The stick fell out when I touched it and natural gas came out. The entire old section of gas lighting supply was intact and live. Figured it was live with gas since 1895 when it as post and tube wired (which was still used for 3rd floor lighting when we bought it.). Also had over 200 Automatic Fireman Cabon-tet balls all through the house

I imagine the house was used as a "summer retreat" by a wealthy family from Richmond, or even as a hotel for the well to do to get out of the hot city in the summer months.

We were looking for an odor of smoke in a house near the Mt. Vernon estate when we came across a fire standpipe in what appeared to be an older single family home that was right on the Potomac. Turns out the place was built as a hotel for the wealthy to take a steamer out of Washington to during the summer months, even though it was only a few miles downstream from DC.

Depending on the color and shape of the glass and the carbon-tet extinguishers can sell for upwards of $200.00 each. Most go in the $10 to $20 range or more if the original bracket is with it.

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41chevy    7,543
7 hours ago, fxfymn said:

I imagine the house was used as a "summer retreat" by a wealthy family from Richmond, or even as a hotel for the well to do to get out of the hot city in the summer months.

We were looking for an odor of smoke in a house near the Mt. Vernon estate when we came across a fire standpipe in what appeared to be an older single family home that was right on the Potomac. Turns out the place was built as a hotel for the wealthy to take a steamer out of Washington to during the summer months, even though it was only a few miles downstream from DC.

Depending on the color and shape of the glass and the carbon-tet extinguishers can sell for upwards of $200.00 each. Most go in the $10 to $20 range or more if the original bracket is with it.

Send you a PM , so as to not hijack bobs thread.   Paul

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mowerman    1,280

Ain't no thing Paul.  Lol have a ball Well we're getting closer cement contractor says it's all most ready 😊...bob

IMG_20170913_072401578_HDR.jpg

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41chevy    7,543

How thick you making the floor?

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mowerman    1,280
14 hours ago, 41chevy said:

How thick you making the floor?

6 inches...bob

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BillyT    416

Good you're using rebar and not just mesh! Some residential driveways and walks in florida are using fiberglass mesh!don't think I'd want that!

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Vladislav    1,882

I like them concrete works. Some nervous while during prep time when you keep your fingers crossed to not get into rains for a week or two and then a mixer truck appears. You start relaxing knowing the cement will set up to the end of the day and the job is done. Have no surprizes until your timbering tells that you needed to pay more attention (damn, more cash!) into its structure. Ok, you put some more supports to it (and sure adds couple more cubic meters of concrete to cover up the leaks) and get it done.

Seeing what your contractors did I'd add the second level or steel into the floor. Actually steel works against bending of the floor only being laid closer to the lower or upper level of the plate. When you bend down (by your truck's weight) the wires should be low. They are pulled and the upper lay of concrete gets pressure. When you bend the floor up (usually when the ground below freezes and extracts) the wires should be at the top level. They get tension again and the concrete pressurizes below.

Having only one level of steel in the middle those wires fix your floor plate from falling into pieces just being pulled to different directions. And not much resistance to big load on it or hard cold.

Hope your contractors know what they do and will guarantee your building long years of life.

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mrsmackpaul    1,507

Very strange how in America a lot of people tie re bar together to make mesh, I have never seen that done out here 
6 inches is very thick I would have thought 
On the farm I grew up on we had a cement pad over 100' square I think around a 120' or 130' and  it was to screw the semi's around on for loading spuds (potato's)  and it was only 3 inches thick and never fell apart and it was in very high rainfall area 80 plus inches a year so we couldnt use gravel 

Good luck with it 

 

Paul

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tjc transport    412

Vlad, with the way that slab is designed it is almost a "floating slab" meaning i it moves it will move as one piece. my home shop is poured the same way, 8 inch center with 18 deep and 24 inches wide at the outer edges. 

22 years now and it has not moved at all. the apron out front of the door dropped almost 1 inch though, because the ground under it was not compacted properly.

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On 9/20/2017 at 7:25 PM, BillyT said:

Good you're using rebar and not just mesh! Some residential driveways and walks in florida are using fiberglass mesh!don't think I'd want that!

Ever take a sledge and try busting-up that fiber cement?

 

2 hours ago, tjc transport said:

Vlad, with the way that slab is designed it is almost a "floating slab" meaning i it moves it will move as one piece. my home shop is poured the same way, 8 inch center with 18 deep and 24 inches wide at the outer edges. 

22 years now and it has not moved at all. the apron out front of the door dropped almost 1 inch though, because the ground under it was not compacted properly.

My house is built on a floating slab, 4" floor and footings are 12" deep and 18" wide.  Have hydronic heat tubing attatched to 1/2" rebar and used fiber cement.  Put a heat tube in the footings.  Have 2" foam 4'X8' sheets around perimeter.  Stick out 4' from footings.  They are laid down at a 45 degree angle.  Builder called them "Canadian footings".  Claims frost will not go through 2" foam but will come around the end, then down and back at 45 dergrees.  The floor is ceramic tile and not a crack any where, so is working well.  Been 17 years so far...   Only use off peak electric for heat and is cheap to heat the two story house.  Few places in the lower 48 get colder or have longer winters.

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mrsmackpaul    1,507

A floating slab has layers of reo not just the lower layer like a normal slab 
A normal slab the reo only stops the slab flexing one way and floating slab has reo top and bottom to stop the slab flexing both ways so it can then float as the ground moves 

Paul 

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Vladislav    1,882

I agree, all depends on how frost might be hard and how the ground is soft or moving. I made some concrete pads outside just in my driveway. Put 10 cm (3") of sand and than the same thick concrete slab. The steel was laid about the same way as in the Bob's flooring above. After the first winter it cracked all the ways cross over. Not much trouble in that since there will bricks, or a kind of road stones put into. But those I made later using just two level wiring keep their solidness for 4-5 seasons now. Floor of a building you're going to keep warm inside is an easier story. Just keep in mind what would happen if you once resolve to not heat it for a winter. Extraction of the ground under slab by freeze is too depends on its wettness also. So if you have the most outside waters away from your foundation the risk of cracking a slab is much less.

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