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Want to build a competition pulling truck


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Hello everyone,

I stumbled across a 1985 mack ultraliner magnum cabover with an E9 in it. My plan is to build a pulling truck out of it but I'm not sure what condition the engine is in. What would be the best way to asses the condition of the inside of this engine? Also does anyone know if cabovers make decent pulling trucks? Any advice on this subject is greatly appreciated.

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When I worked at the Cat dealer in Columbus, we had a chassis dyno which is a great way to put the engine under load and watch the temps, pressures, fuel flow, etc. Compared to the cost of an overhaul, it could be cheap insurance.

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Build a poor man's manometer to tap into the oil dipstick. Find a clear piece of clear milk line that clamps over the dipstick, cut 14' feet of it. Make two vertical columns with a loop at the bottom with the top of one column hooked onto the oil dipstick and the other open to air then loosely U-staple the u-shaped line to a 3 foot piece of 2X6 board and mount it in the cab. Fill the loop half full with water and food coloring. Have your buddy measure the inch spread under load to check your blowby. Should be 6" spread or less for a tight motor.

Pull tractor should have a loose engine anyway. Check with an oil sample instead to see base metal condition. Loose piston engines do well for pulling and modifying. The best pull tractors we have around here won't even start without ether during summer months. Pistons swell over per heat.  When you atomize water and soluble oil solution into the intake for piston cooling it will tighten everything right up and compression goes through the roof.

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If I was building a puller and running the engine(V8 or straight6) RPM/torque/HP way over stock.........I wouldn't be sitting over the engine heads in a cab over. You want all the engine heads pointing at God, he can handle it.

Also assume your fire is going to occur in the engine compartment. You may want to be behind the fire rather than above it, things can get crazy with that kind of power. You envision the door flying open and a quick 10 foot leap to safety, in reality they may be trying to extract you from that height.

In 2012 we had an older operator suffer a massive heart attack in the seat of a large front loader, the hardest part was getting enough mechanics and staff to manually lower him 10 feet safely to the ground for CPR. Dead before we could get him to the shop floor.

 

 

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First off, read the rule book... No point in spending thousands on a pulling truck only to find it doesn't meet and take advantage of the rules. Then, do some "engineering"... Are the length of pulls limited by traction or wheelstands? That will tell you if you need weight in front (cabover) or back (conventional). As for using a V8 or 6, will the V8 just spin the rear wheels more?

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Build a poor man's manometer to tap into the oil dipstick. Find a clear piece of clear milk line that clamps over the dipstick, cut 14' feet of it. Make two vertical columns with a loop at the bottom with the top of one column hooked onto the oil dipstick and the other open to air then loosely U-staple the u-shaped line to a 3 foot piece of 2X6 board and mount it in the cab. Fill the loop half full with water and food coloring. Have your buddy measure the inch spread under load to check your blowby. Should be 6" spread or less for a tight motor.

Pull tractor should have a loose engine anyway. Check with an oil sample instead to see base metal condition. Loose piston engines do well for pulling and modifying. The best pull tractors we have around here won't even start without ether during summer months. Pistons swell over per heat.  When you atomize water and soluble oil solution into the intake for piston cooling it will tighten everything right up and compression goes through the roof.

Amazing ... any pics of this? Do you have to plug the breather for this?

 

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Fun is what they fine you for!

My name is Bob Buckman sir,. . . and I hate truckers.

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Amazing ... any pics of this? Do you have to plug the breather for this?

 

Seems quirky, but no, don't plug anything. Plugging would blow the water out. If you are drafting the engine back into intake remove and let hang to atmosphere......otherwise you are negative pressure.

 

P8170009.thumb.JPG.44b1ce98fe35152cd7944b9984575113.JPG

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Hello everyone,

I stumbled across a 1985 mack ultraliner magnum cabover with an E9 in it. My plan is to build a pulling truck out of it but I'm not sure what condition the engine is in. What would be the best way to asses the condition of the inside of this engine? Also does anyone know if cabovers make decent pulling trucks? Any advice on this subject is greatly appreciated.

An MH Magnum package Ultra-Liner is a rare truck. I'd rather see it sold to someone who will preserve it.

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P8170010.thumb.JPG.5e1d60cd50115d7ae34dda04e7e97b83.JPG

 

You have to read at full govern and load. Have a partner in the cab interpreting. Our group expected Mack E7 to stay under 6" or we would be putting sleeves in. On the 80's engines you just look at the worm for your tach-out..LOL if you can't make the oil leak stop your crank is supercharged!!!!

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P8170010.thumb.JPG.5e1d60cd50115d7ae34dda04e7e97b83.JPG

 

You have to read at full govern and load. Have a partner in the cab interpreting. Our group expected Mack E7 to stay under 6" or we would be putting sleeves in. On the 80's engines you just look at the worm for your speed-o out..LOL if you can't make the oil leak stop your crank is supercharged!!!!

I don't understand the last sentence, but the image is very helpful.... you are a welcome asset here.... I think I like this idea so well because it looks like something a farmer would do.

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Fun is what they fine you for!

My name is Bob Buckman sir,. . . and I hate truckers.

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I know Tom runs a K100 with a KT600 and is very competitive with it from the videos on Youtube.  

 Mack Tech brings a good point about being on top of the engine..........

 

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IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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will the V8 just spin the rear wheels more?

From what I know wheel speed is EVERYTHING.  Get the motor at max rpm, wheels spinning and go.  Yes, the front end up so all the force is on the rear tires, but you want it spinning to get ground speed which will take you the farthest.

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IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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If I was building a puller and running the engine(V8 or straight6) RPM/torque/HP way over stock.........I wouldn't be sitting over the engine heads in a cab over. You want all the engine heads pointing at God, he can handle it.

Also assume your fire is going to occur in the engine compartment. You may want to be behind the fire rather than above it, things can get crazy with that kind of power. You envision the door flying open and a quick 10 foot leap to safety, in reality they may be trying to extract you from that height.

In 2012 we had an older operator suffer a massive heart attack in the seat of a large front loader, the hardest part was getting enough mechanics and staff to manually lower him 10 feet safely to the ground for CPR. Dead before we could get him to the shop floor.

 

 

You just crushed my dreams. Very good points I never thought of.

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I don't understand the last sentence, but the image is very helpful.... you are a welcome asset here.... I think I like this idea so well because it looks like something a farmer would do.

Thanks for the encouragement! I always watched (and sometimes used) this sight, but never hopped on till the Log Dog came to town. Wanted to contribute something instead of just being a consumer of info. Good crew of folks really, all fights aside.  

On the E6 they didn't seal the tach drive gear. Operators with sloppy engines would come in complaining of a leak at that spot. The engine crank pressure would be driving motor oil out the tach drive and it was generally unfixable. A good indicator of trouble coming:). Manometer blow was usually high on these units.

Seems like a farm tool, but we had one at the shop that was made by a tool vendor. Was molded and had a steel center with ascending and descending increments.

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An MH Magnum package Ultra-Liner is a rare truck. I'd rather see it sold to someone who will preserve it.

Agreed! IMHO it'd be OK to keep it fairly stock and run it in amateur local pulls, but it'd be a sacrilege to hack it all up to be competitive as a pro puller on the circuit. Pretty expensive too... Building a top pulling semi truck will easily run into 6 figures!

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on of my biggest fears when pulling with the old R600 was a flywheel or something coming thru the floor. I have seen what a runaway engine can do to a bell housing when a clutch/flywheel lets go. a cab over would be even worse. If it had big power a scatter shield of some sort would be a must.

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