Recommended Posts

Shame.  Lots of good stuff.  Dump looks like an R-700 series also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

think I have a Mack boner over that Detroit powered Mack. looks like you could pull start it and drive it home. not much on my Mack R model parts list except I want a white steering wheel and an extended bumper and brackets for an early R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much demand for 2 stroke Detroits, especially 71 series without a turbo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Not much demand for 2 stroke Detroits, especially 71 series without a turbo.

Uummmm......   OK.......?

Maybe someone outside the local area may want it the way it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scrap prices are pretty much the same everywhere...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you saying that a truck a hobbyist might want should be scrapped?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Detroit Diesel competed with Cummins for the biggest class 8 market share during the 60s and 70s, and probably shipped over a million 2 stroke truck engines total. How many collectors are in the market for a 2 stroke Detroit? Maybe a thousand. Given how slowly old trucks seem to move from the groves and back lots to the recyclers, there are more than enough 2 stroke Detroits around to overflow the shops and yards of every collector.

And if I wanted a 2 stroke Detroit, I'd prefer it in a matching GM product like an Astro or General!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maybe where you are, but here on the east coast 2 stroke detroits are rarer than hens teeth!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mostly because nobody wanted them and they were scrapped!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yea, not exactly, an original Detroit powered Mack is like hens teeth.  try finding one that has not been hacked. or frame junk or whatever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent many hours in a  Brockway triaxle with the lowly 318 with a 13 speed I thought it did real well, I had a coal box and I would load that truck up with crusher stone dust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i ran a 79 brockway 761 with a 8V92 detroit and 13 speed pulling a low boy trailer all over the east coast in the 80's. we also had a 1970 Diamond Reo tandem tractor with the 8V71 13 speed combo that was hooked to the dump trailer. 

2 terex TS36 scrapper pans with 12V71 front and 8V71 rear power. 

a terex dozer with 671 power, a poclain excavater with 12V71 detroit power, and 2 275 michigan loaders with 12V71's detroits. 

when the bossman died in 91 his son sold all the old detroit powered machines for enough money to replace most of them with new cat machines. he traded the two tractors for a 79 V8 superliner that came with a new 350 six cylinder and an 18 speed trans to replace the tired V8. 

i really wish i still had that Brockway, it was a beast. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even in it's hayday when fuel was cheap, the Detroit 2 stroke sold mostly because it and it's parts were cheap. Today a 2 stroke Detroit is thoroughly obsolete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long is the blue dump box and how much do they want for it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Even in it's hayday when fuel was cheap, the Detroit 2 stroke sold mostly because it and it's parts were cheap. Today a 2 stroke Detroit is thoroughly obsolete.

https://arb.ca.gov/ports/marinevess/harborcraft/documents/alttechccts102610.pdf

Don Fairchild is the guru of bus 2 strokes and came up with this kit for marine engines which has caused a resurgence in their use as coastal communities and harbours clamped down on fish boats with 2 strokes...

I like them so much I have four..!!!  piece of cake to work on

BC Mack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only thing I have to say is the 8v71 was an awesome prime mover in many pieces of Fire Apparatus (excluding MACKs) back in the 70’s -- 80’s during my FD days.  I loved operating them over the few Cummins the County had which would barely get out of their own way on takeoff  but they did perform great on the open road once you got them going. I feel while operating in an urban setting with many stop signs and traffic light the Detroit's were best back in the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sure would like one of those hoods would make a great spare should anything happen to mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

somebody really needs to step up and buy that R773, it looks complete and pretty much unmolested,looks to be in decent shape,too,and it's such an early one,serial # 1007.I sure wish things were different here,makes me sick I can't even think of buying it,I've been wanting a Detroit powered Mack forever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Irregardless of the power plant the low chassis number and condition should make that one worth saving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celli  Trucking  Co (Chicago  area) ran several  R773's. None exist today  (as far as I know). Pal's Cartage,Gretna,Edmier, and several  other Chicago  based outfits  ran them  back in the day. Like Superdog  said, the low serial  number and the fact that it looks pretty  much  intact is reason for saving that truck. True it may  not  be  the  most  desirable  R-700 in existence,but certainly  one of  the  most  rarest  of the breed anymore (next to Mikes  903 powered R-700). As for the "who wants one"banter, you sound  like a modern day truck salesman! Al Rhino...............Good  Day!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had 1976 R773 that we used to pull 50 ton lowboy. Moved Cat 235, 225, D8H, D6C, 950 and 966C all over Detroit area. Used it till 1993, was a very good lowboy truck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now