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Kenworth to display new T880S mixers at 2017 World of Concrete


kscarbel2
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Kenworth Truck Company Press Release  /  January 16, 2017

Two new Kenworth T880S set-forward front axle mixers are Kenworth’s showcase construction trucks at the upcoming 2017 World of Concrete Show Jan. 17-20 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Kenworth’s booth (No. C6020) will feature a 5-axle Kenworth T880S mixer with a 2017 Paccar [DAF] MX-11 430-hp engine with 1,650 lb-ft of torque, Allison 4700 RDS 7-speed automatic transmission, 20,000-pound front axle and suspension, 46,000-pound rear axle and suspension.

Also on display will be a 4-axle Kenworth T880S mixer equipped with a 2017 Paccar [DAF] MX-13 405-hp engine with 1,450 lb-ft of torque, Allison 4500 RDS 6-speed automatic transmission, 20,000-pound front axle and suspension, and 46,000-pound rear axle and suspension.

“The rugged and reliable T880S is designed to deliver excellent performance in vocational applications where every incremental pound of payload delivered contributes directly to the bottom line, and excellent maneuverability and visibility are valued,” said Kurt Swihart, Kenworth marketing director.  “With a 114-inch BBC and best-in-class 28-inch bumper setting, contractors can operate highly productive mixer trucks that easily meet the Federal Bridge formula with minimum tare weight and the capability for enhanced body installations.”

The bumper setting is critical to spec’ing Bridge Formula chassis so they remain under the 40-foot length limit, Swihart added. The weight rating for the set-forward front axle on the T880S ranges from 14,600 pounds to 22,800 pounds. Contractors can also choose single, tandem or tridem drive axles, and a wide variety of factory-installed lift axles, to meet their jobsite requirements. The T880S provides clear back-of-cab options that make it easy to configure truck bodies, handle extreme loads and make it easier for body upfitting.

“Contractors will like that the new model’s lower hood profile that provides their drivers up to four feet of additional ground visibility,” Swihart said. “That can be particularly important for drivers operating in the tight confines of many job sites.”

The T880S is standard with the 12.9-liter MX-13 engine, which provides up to 510-hp and 1,850 lb-ft of torque. For weight-sensitive applications, the 10.8-liter MX-11 engine saves 400 pounds compared to a 13-liter engine, offers an impressive power to weight ratio, and low fuel consumption. The MX-11 with up to 430-hp and 1,650 lb-ft of torque is well-suited for ready-mix trucks.

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Kenworth T880S Enters Production with Strong Demand from Robust Construction Market

Kenworth Truck Company Press Release  /  March 6, 2017

The Kenworth T880S has been a much-anticipated option for mixer body builders and their customers needing to meet the federal bridge formula. And, with T880S production commencing this week, order boards are filling up. McNeilus Manufacturing, a division of Oshkosh; and Con-Tech Manufacturing are the first customers receiving T880S chassis during this first week of production.
 
The Kenworth T880S features a set-forward front axle, which makes it the go-to configuration for mixer customers needing to comply with federal bridge formulas. “We’re glad production is rolling, and the response has been great,” said Tom Harris, who serves as McNeilus vice president of concrete mixers. “A large percentage of our orders are for the set-forward configuration.”

Kenworth is displaying seven T880 trucks, five of which are T880S models, at this week’s CONEXPO-CON/AGG show in Las Vegas. On display in the Kenworth booth (S-62939) is a McNeilus T880S with an 11-yard BridgeMaster® body destined for Ozinga Ready-Mix based in Chicago, Illinois.
 
According to Harris, the Kenworth T880S is being spec’d in a four-axle configuration with an overall length under 40 feet. “And we’re recommending the T880S be spec’d with the PACCAR MX-11 engine, which saves our customers significant weight (400 pounds over a 13-liter engine) while supplying enough power to get the job done.”
 
Harris said Kenworth is a preferred supplier to McNeilus and the company has always done a great job of building its trucks with the mixer market in mind. “Our customers appreciate the little things that Kenworth does to make a great mixer truck,” he said. “The cowl-mounted mirrors are an example. A driver will typically have the door open when at a job site, but they’ll also use the mirrors and that can only be done if it’s cowl-mounted.” A big fan of the T880, Harris said the bigger windshield and lines of sight are a welcome addition, “along with the ergonomics and the quietness of the cab,” he added. “The T880 is just a great truck for our market.”
 
Also on-display in Kenworth’s booth is a T880S with Con-Tech BridgeKing® 11-yard body, which will go to Eagle Redi-Mix based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, after the show. Response in the market to Kenworth’s T880 and T880S has been “tremendous,” said Dan Welsh, president of Con-Tech Manufacturing. “The larger cab, visibility, dash layout and modern look have really caught the attention of our customers,” he explained. “They love it. We’re now seeing the pendulum swing towards orders for the set-forward configuration, and we expect about 80 percent of our Kenworth build will be for the T880S model.”

According to Welsh, the quality of Kenworth and the Con-Tech body is a great match. “Quality all the way around,” he said. “That keeps our customers productive on the job site, and keeps them coming back for more of our mixers as they grow their business.”
 
The T880S is available with a set-forward front axle ranging from 14,600 pounds to 22,800 pounds and is available with a 114-inch BBC and best-in-class 28-inch bumper setting as well as 29.5-inch and 31.5-inch bumper settings as options for dump truck, crane, or other construction applications. The bumper setting is especially important in complying with federal bridge formula where the chassis is required to stay under 40 feet in length.

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I guess if you are backing up to a concrete pump, a rear discharge does the job-and at a cost effective up front price.  But it seems around here most of the new purchases are front discharge.  Once contractors get used to the ease of working with front discharges, they don't want some guy backing on to the job site and jumping into the truck every two minutes to reposition.

I'm sure in the big fleets  can justify a good mix of front/rear but it seems the smaller guys have to make the decision as to what works best for MOST of their customers.  You can still feed a pump with a front discharge AND the residential foundation pour goes a lot quicker.  Much more flexibility but for sure at a higher upfront cost.

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My dad drove mixers in the '60s and '70s (right up until 1980), then went into business pouring foundations. I've been in business doing flatwork since 1999. Today was the first time I've seen a rear-discharge mixer around here in at least 20 years. Maybe closer to 25.

And the mixer I saw today was being towed by a wrecker. Looked fairly new and appeared to be a roll-over.

Front discharge for the win.

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From the standpoints of cost, design, production and maintenance, front discharge mixers are inherently a nightmare.

There's nothing you can't do with rear-discharge mixers and concrete pumpers (one of the best inventions since sliced bread).

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17 hours ago, Red Horse said:

I guess if you are backing up to a concrete pump, a rear discharge does the job-and at a cost effective up front price.  But it seems around here most of the new purchases are front discharge.  Once contractors get used to the ease of working with front discharges, they don't want some guy backing on to the job site and jumping into the truck every two minutes to reposition.

I'm sure in the big fleets  can justify a good mix of front/rear but it seems the smaller guys have to make the decision as to what works best for MOST of their customers.  You can still feed a pump with a front discharge AND the residential foundation pour goes a lot quicker.  Much more flexibility but for sure at a higher upfront cost.

When we built our house in '99 it was all front loaders that delivered to us. One driver was so good at pouring the footing l thought he was going to do it all by himself.   Hippy

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What was the story with Mack front discharge mixers. I talked with some guys who thought they were the best and others who thought they were the worst (compared to Oshkosh and Advance).  Main difference seemed to be the idea of putting the engine under the drum. Again some said this was a great advantage and others said it was like the dumbest idea ever (probably the guys who had to work on it).

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About ten years ago I went up to Mass. to help my uncle work on one of his friends houses.  We needed some concrete so we ordered some from a local yard and it arrives in a rear loader....  A b81 rear loader.  Made my day.

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5 hours ago, RoadwayR said:

Too much weight on the front axle.  

Took another look at that KW  and it doesn't look like it would have much weight at all on the steer axle ( but it still has floats?).  I thought you could do 20,000 lbs on the front of mixer in CA.  I must have missed something.

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On 3/10/2017 at 7:42 PM, kscarbel2 said:

From the standpoints of cost, design, production and maintenance, front discharge mixers are inherently a nightmare.

There's nothing you can't do with rear-discharge mixers and concrete pumpers (one of the best inventions since sliced bread).

Kevin -No argument on your points on the negatives associated with front discharge.  But like I said, with a driver controlling the chute direction, discharge rate and following a form with the vehicle, there is no way you are going to compete with a rear discharge-and for sure no one wants to pay for a pump on say the typical residential foundation pour.

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8 hours ago, Red Horse said:

Kevin -No argument on your points on the negatives associated with front discharge.  But like I said, with a driver controlling the chute direction, discharge rate and following a form with the vehicle, there is no way you are going to compete with a rear discharge-and for sure no one wants to pay for a pump on say the typical residential foundation pour.

Precisely.

If you aren't using a pump, and the VAST amount of jobs around here (and probably everywhere) don't use pumps for a variety of reasons, a rear discharge mixer simply cannot compete with a front. Fronts can get around jobsites better, they can provide the slump you want more quickly and efficiently, and they can put the end of the chute in the exact spot you want every time and at all times.

Rears are dinosaurs in almost all applications.

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 Never drove a mixer, but my good friend did...a B model! He was about 18 or 19. One of those " natural truck drivers" that come along from time to time! About 1972. He used to ride with me in my wrecker.I was 26 he was about 16. Decided to let him drive! Backing a car on a wrecker is the same principle as backing an 18,just shorter! The second time he backed a car up he put it right in! He went to work at the local Diamond T/Reo Dealer as a lot boy.next time I saw him was driving for Coastal Tank Lines I was driving for Nu Car Carriers. That's how it used to be you"worked  your way up"! I Dont think it's quite that way these days! Interestingly I just saw a big ad on tv for TMC ! A sign of the times! When they we're starting out it was rumored that if the owner opened a truck door and it wasn't clean the driver was terminated! Now the so called "driver shortage" has them begging for drivers among the general population! Have they changed hands? Good luck with the clean interiors!😁

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