Sledneck32

Best Vision or Pinnacle for Vocational Work

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Sledneck32    1

Hi everyone, second post here.

I've been tasked with getting our new spray truck purchased and tooled up. We are going to be doing manhole repairs with it. A lot of guys I know buy a tractor and stretch it and then put the 24' insulated van body on top. The "regular" straight trucks I guess don't have enough power to do the job. I have been told we need 350hp to be happy. 10-12k FA and 40k RA. 

We won't be logging a ton of miles on it. The average day would be about a 30-60 minute drive to the jobsite, work all day, drive home. Not a ton of work in the winter so I would be surprised if we put 20,000 miles on it in a year. Another guy I know doing the same work only gets about 10,000 miles per year. I would like to get a truck I can count on for say 10 years worth of work.

I have spent at least a month now Googling and reading online forums. In some respects, I shoulda just bought a truck blind right outta the gate because now I've heard so many horror stories I don't know which way to turn!!

That being said, I've heard the Macks have a comfortable interior for a tall guy (6'7") and known for good work rigs. It seems everything built over the last 15 years is "junk" according to at least someone. The local Mack dealer only seems to want to sell me 2012 and 2013 fleet trucks with 350,000 miles on them I think MP8's. They look nice/clean but by the time we remove sleeper, stretch frame, add van body etc etc it starts adding up big time. The salesman also said to avoid I think 2008-2011 as well due to emissions issues.

The below pic is what the end setup should look like roughly. I know this pic is on dirt, but really 98% of the work is on city streets.

Any recommendations? Would it make any sense to try find a reefer truck and just take the refrigeration unit off and add another rear axle?

 

99cfa0_6da79617345349a69f18799e9f3a58ec.

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Sledneck32    1
On 1/12/2017 at 9:51 AM, Underdog said:

Do you have the body to install on a cab & chassis? Or do you modify an existing body? Seems like that wheelbase/body combo on tandem rears should be readily available. The setup in your picture would GVW around 58,000lb. So most would have at least 350hp.

I run NYC a lot and many city delivery trucks are set up this way. Check out big city dealers to find this type of truck, new or used.

We don't have the body yet. Planning on ordering a new one as soon as we get a truck bought.

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Dirtymilkman    875
51 minutes ago, Sledneck32 said:

This truck here is basically already set up just how we need it.  Everybody says to avoid the 2004's though. Are they THAT bad? Is there anything I can do to see if they got the kinks worked out of it?

http://www.commercialtrucktrader.com/listing/2004-Mack-Vision-Cx613--117508277

Yes! They are that bad

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Sledneck32    1

Well that sucks lol.

 

The Kenworth guy told me to avoid 2004, 2008, and 2011. 

Anybody know the particulars of them? This here truck is practically ready to go. Worst case scenario if the motor was a problem child, couldn't a guy just put in a different one for $8-10,000?

2004 Kenworth T300

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Dirtymilkman    875

That looks like a great truck actually. I would get them to throw in a dpf cleaning and service in the deal. If you're stretching it anyways why daycab it? Sleeper can be handy if you don't have slobs driving it. 

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Sledneck32    1

Well, we're construction workers. There's practically zero chance anyone would be willing to spend overnights in the trucks. We need hotels, showers, food etc. And also, if I DIDN'T remove the sleeper, the truck would be so stinkin long it'd be like a limousine. I need a 24'-28 box.

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Sledneck32    1

1485395359889-119841662.jpgWell just signed the agreement on a 2013 cxu613. 

450,000 miles
M Drive
Mp8 445hp

$42,000

Plan is to daycab it, stretch frame from 221" to 270" roughly. Install 24' van body with small crane, stairs, toolbox and vise on remaining 2' of Frame. Will be used for vocational work lining manholes. Heavy duty Industrial painting. This is my first truck. Very nice shape cosmetically inside and out. How did I do? Didn't really get any wiggle on price, but very nice and patient salesman who's spent at least 12 hours so far teaching me about trucks and answering noob questions.

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Sledneck32    1

Engine brake

M-Drive

Air ride

12/40 axles

221" wheelbase

Aluminum wheels

Air conditioning 

Power steering

Grand Tour interior

Twin 93 gallon tanks

Power windows/locks

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Sledneck32    1

Bump....

Wondering what it takes to beef up the front end on this truck? We almost have the deal closed but I have run into some issues. Basically, by the time I get the van body mounted, the front axle is gonna almost be maxxed out at 12k pounds. How much can it be increased before a guy should just be looking for another truck? Salesman mentioned that they use the same axle for heavier trucks, maybe could just switch springs or add a leaf?

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TeamsterGrrrl    476

Find another salesman. This is a common problem with tractors converted to straight trucks- Not enough front axle capacity. I'd do some careful calculations of what everything you're going to put on the truck weights, and where that weight will end up. To correctly increase front axle capacity you often have to change everything- tires, wheels, brakes, axle, springs, even the frame. It's usually easier just to buy a straight truck with adequate capacity in the first place.

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Sledneck32    1
27 minutes ago, TeamsterGrrrl said:

Find another salesman. This is a common problem with tractors converted to straight trucks- Not enough front axle capacity. I'd do some careful calculations of what everything you're going to put on the truck weights, and where that weight will end up. To correctly increase front axle capacity you often have to change everything- tires, wheels, brakes, axle, springs, even the frame. It's usually easier just to buy a straight truck with adequate capacity in the first place.

I see your also in the Midwest. I'm in MN. Do you have a recommendation?

 

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TeamsterGrrrl    476

Maybe Nuss Mack/Volvo? Not cheap, but a lot of folks like them. Also the Boyer dealerships.

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Sledneck32    1
1 hour ago, TeamsterGrrrl said:

Maybe Nuss Mack/Volvo? Not cheap, but a lot of folks like them. Also the Boyer dealerships.

That's who I'm dealing with. The guy in particular has been with Nuss for 42 years and is the nicest most patient guy I ever met. I've been to a TON of dealerships in the last two months, and this guy is the only one who would give me the time of day. All the other places would blow me off if I didn't have my checkbook out in the first ten minutes. Literally they'd walk off and go greet someone else at the door! Even if it costs a tad more money, it's nice to deal with someone who actually will talk to me on the phone.

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