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need4steam

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I came across several B model Macks on a farm the other day. None have ran in probably ten years. Sorry, I have no pictures.

#1) B68 single axle tractor. It has a gas engine and a duplex transmission. Body is in very good original condition. Appears to be complete and is parked in a barn. Now my questions: What's it worth? What are the pluses and minuses to the engine and transmission? Will a diesel and triplex or quadraplex fit? 

#2) B87 tandem truck no fifth wheel right now. It has a cummins with a quadraplex. Body is in good original condition. Appears complete and is parked in a barn. What is it worth? What are the pluses and minuses to this engine and tranny? (outside of some fancy shifting)

#3) B53??? tandem dump truck. It has a diesel with a quadraplex. This truck is outside but the body appears surprisingly good. What's it worth? Any other things that I should check out?

All these trucks were running when parked. I am assuming no major engine or transmission problems. I am already planning on complete brake work and upgrade. When finished, I plan on pulling a lowboy trailer with a 26,000 load to antique shows and parades less than 50 miles from home and only 6? times a year. I personally think the B68 gasser would be the most economical to restore and would probably suite my needs. I would have to admit a tandem diesel would be my ideal tractor.

Another question is on license. I have a farm and could license a truck for farm but this is not actually for farm use. I have heard that I could license a truck as historic/antique. My primary goal for this truck is to go to shows and parades with steam engine as the load. This does appear to fit as a Indiana antique license. I would appreciate any input. I want to be safe and legal. Lord knows that I don't want to upset DOT.

Thanks 

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B-68   1503 made

B-87  75 made

B-53  2625 made.

Photos would help

 

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I bought a B 68 a number of years ago at what appeared to be a bargain price. It had a 540 gas with a duplex direct. It got about 3-4 mpg (t/a cab & chassis). When it came time to sell I got about half the price of a diesel.

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I have a B87,one heavy truck.Mine has a triple frame,cummins power,65 rears,20 front.Used to pull our lowboy.Would like to see some pictures.Mine has the larger of the 2 type of radiator top tanks, haven't ever seen another one like it.If you're not interested I may be.If the price is right buy them all.

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buy them all. the thing about the gas job B models is they weren't beat as bad as say a B61T. you were lucky to get a 100,000 miles out of the flathead and some overhead valve engines. a 673 on the other hand minus head gasket issues could get you a million so in turn a lot of the sheet metal was worn out and fatigued.

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B87 75 units made???

Never thought they are that rare.

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The trail of the three bulldogs (B68, B53, B87) that I started this thread on has gotten a little cold. Funny how a daughter's wedding and money can get in the way.

Now, I have some questions that is going to prove how much of a rookie I am. Would someone explain the B-model numbering system. I understand that if it ends in even, its a gas engine. If its odd, its a diesel. And, obviously the B-8X look the different than B-6x. But, to me, a B81 looks like a B-87. And a B-53 looks like a B-68. Is there something in appearance that I'm missing? Are there differences in capacity, wheelbase, single, tandem, semi tractor or straight truck? Maybe I'm missing the forest for the trees.

Thanks in advance,

Doug

 

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Basically, a higher number model indicates higher weight rating. You are correct with your assessment of diesel vs. gas engines. A B-68 would be very similar to a B-67 in weight rating and features, the only difference being gas or diesel. Many gas jobs were converted to diesel over the years, not hard to do if you have a donor truck. For your next lesson, the type of engine and basic configuration can also be determined by the model number. For complete details, you would need the entire serial number. For example, my truck is an F-600, the general model range that could have many options. Specifically, it is an F-607T, indicating a non-turbo 673 diesel. The T denotes the truck left the factory as a single axle tractor. An F-685ST Would be a tandem tractor with a 237hp Maxidyne. There are published charts with the B-model number breakdowns.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

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The 80 series trucks had military style fenders where the rest had the rounded fenders. Look long and hard at the frames and sheet metal, if it has a double or triple frame look for spread from pack rust and rot both can mean serious time in repair. The rear of the cabs love to rot out and make sure the fenders are solid. Vent windows are top dollar good glass can be a big plus. If you expect a decent road speed check the differential ratios. 6 to 7 ratios can get you around 50-55 with the low rpm Mack diesels. I am sure somebody else can chime in with more pointers. I wouldn't be afraid to buy the gasser it can always be repowered but keep in mind parts are getting harder to find for any of the old power plants

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