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mack mhe9

electronic log books

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OK I get a phone call from J J Keller the log book people ask if I'm ready for ELDS.

So he starts telling me all the safety benefits that this will do for me and then he said all you have to do is plug it in to my data port?

I say hold it.

A data port?

Yes to comply with the Federal Government mandate it has to plug in to the engine controller.

And what if you have a mechanical engine?

You get to buy a newer truck or you can no longer run your truck.

I hope there will be some amendments or my brand new E9 will be useless in 2 years.

Any thoughts?

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OK I get a phone call from J J Keller the log book people ask if I'm ready for ELDS.

So he starts telling me all the safety benefits that this will do for me and then he said all you have to do is plug it in to my data port?

I say hold it.

A data port?

Yes to comply with the Federal Government mandate it has to plug in to the engine controller.

And what if you have a mechanical engine?

You get to buy a newer truck or you can no longer run your truck.

I hope there will be some amendments or my brand new E9 will be useless in 2 years.

Any thoughts?

you need to start raising hell tomorrow then or no amendments will even be considered

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That's bad news. I would like to put a like this for the information but cannot like it.I hope I can hold out 2 more years. I am 65 years old and not ready to retire financially in good shape but mentally I still like working.Are there going to be any exemptions?Thanks Joe D.

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Thought the mandate stated in October that the AOBRD could be electronic, electric, electro-mechanical or mechanical ?

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I think ks ran a piece on this just a few days ago` maybe he has some updated info on what is being planned I have`nt been keeping up as much as i should as of last couple months

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Last year, Jim Winsor and I were having a conversation about this very topic. He was in the beginning stages of doing research to write a guest editoral for HDT on this matter, but then he got sick and then of course he passed. I was under the impression from our conversations that the Gubmint would adopt certain exemptions for mechanical equipment, but we never got into depth in it. I owe his wife a phone call, maybe I will ask her if she still has his research file on the article and if I could take a peek at it.

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Only exemptions will be for a non American.Our guest will get a pass for so many years.

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This is so stupid, when a G.P.S signal could be used instead with extreme accuracy.

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This is so stupid, when a G.P.S signal could be used instead with extreme accuracy.

There is nothing simple when you have people with no experience in the field making rules. Here is the FAQ from the FCMSA page

EOBR/ELD and E-Log Frequently Asked Questions
What is an electronic on-board recorder (EOBR) or electronic logging device (ELD)?
An EOBR or ELD is an electronic device that is capable of recording a driver's driving hours and duty status automatically (the older term "EOBR" is being phased out and replaced by "ELD").
Are EOBRs or ELDs required?
The FMCSA wrote rules in 2010 that would have required certain carriers to use EOBRs, but those rules were subsequently removed. The FMCSA published a proposal in March 2014 to require ELDs for all drivers currently required to log.
What is an automatic on-board recording device (AOBRD)?
An AOBRD is an electric, electronic, electromechanical, or mechanical device capable of recording a driver's duty status information automatically as required by 49 CFR §395.15. AOBRDs are currently the only regulated devices for automatically capturing a driver’s hours of service. The device must be integrally synchronized with specific operations of the commercial motor vehicle in which it is installed. At a minimum, the device has to record engine use, road speed, miles driven, the date, and time of day. The proposal released in March 2014 includes specifications the new ELD must meet
My drivers do their logs on laptops and smartphones. Are those considered AOBRDs?
These devices are not AOBRDs unless they are directly or indirectly connected to the engine to automatically collect the required movement and speed data. Such non-integrated devices are allowed for logging but the driver must be able to produce a compliant paper log on demand.
First and foremost, electronic logs can greatly simplify compliance by eliminating the need for paper logs. Drivers and carriers see significant time savings from going paperless.
Some of the most common logging violations can be eliminated. Virtually all “form and manner” log violations go away, drivers always know where they stand on compliance, and drivers always have a current log. Alerts will tell driver when they are approaching an hours-of-service limit.
Besides making compliance easier, electronic logs make auditing easier and faster. The systems typically come with automated auditing built in.
Roadside inspections can be easier and quicker.
Scheduling and dispatch become easier because office personnel know the location of the vehicles and how much time drivers have available.
Location, engine use, speed, and other data captured by the devices can prove valuable during litigation or other legal proceedings, potentially protecting both the driver and company.
What happens if an AOBRD stops working?
If an AOBRD fails, the driver must:
Note the failure of the device;
Reconstruct his/her logs for the current day and the previous 7 days, less any days for which the driver has records; and
Continue to prepare a handwritten log until the device is working again.
Can the FMCSA request our GPS records during an audit?
Yes, records from Global Positioning Systems (GPS) may be subject to audit by the FMCSA (whether those systems are a part of an e-log system or not). Such records are considered "supporting documents" for hours-of-service compliance, and must be maintained by the motor carrier for six months. The FMCSA may use GPS records to verify the information contained on drivers' logs, even if the company does not do so.
What has to be carried on the vehicle in addition to the EOBR itself?
A driver using an AOBRD must also carry:
An instruction sheet describing how data can be stored and retrieved from the device; and
A supply of blank logs (records of duty status) sufficient to record the driver’s duty status and other related information for the duration of the current trip.

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Probably gonna get chastised by a few on here but here's my experience with Elogs. When I came off the road to a local/close region day job the co I went to work for has Elogs. Gotta be honest and say I love them. Didn't think I would being old school but life is much easier. Yes they are going to make some co's change the way they do business but if done right most co's won't need to buy more equipment and hire drivers. As for those who say it will cost me pay I've found you make out better. So don't knock it till you've tried it. As for adaptation to older equipment a gps device tied in with the elog device should solve that issue. Bottom line is mandatory implementation of Elogs is coming whether we like it or not so...

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But there's no Grey area.

If a month ago your were an hour out on a Friday and you just go home for the weekend you will now get a ticket.

I only run about 85000 miles a year so I'm not over worked but some times I have to make decisions that fit in between the lines.

And what if I jump in some one else's truck and run a couple loads.

So are they recording my time or the trucks time. I think it's going to be a mess.

From what I read both truck(s) and driver(s)

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the system on our trucks is tied in to a central computer. No matter who's truck I use when I log on in the morning I use my birthday and it keeps track of my time no matter what truck or day of the week. My former employer did not have Elogs but all trucks had a small gps tracker that was wired into the fuse box that transmitted back to the office. I'm thinking with the preelectronic trucks a usb wire between the elog device and the gps will give a dot cop the info he/she needs when they down load from the unit.

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the system on our trucks is tied in to a central computer. No matter who's truck I use when I log on in the morning I use my birthday and it keeps track of my time no matter what truck or day of the week. My former employer did not have Elogs but all trucks had a small gps tracker that was wired into the fuse box that transmitted back to the office. I'm thinking with the preelectronic trucks a usb wire between the elog device and the gps will give a dot cop the info he/she needs when they down load from the unit.

Law states a connection to Power Train Control Modules to record braking, acceleration and cornering (?) GPS seems to be separate as written from the Automatic On Board Recording Device. All I read was there is/ was to be an hours exemption for Perishable loads.

Pointless to fret til the law is finalized, speculation and such is moot.

J.J. Keller is in business to sell their product , via any means possible... implied fear works wonders

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Yes sir. I guess it was to go in effect Nov. 2015 but like everything else we won't know till the damage is done.

But it still sounds like a mechanical engine is doomed.

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I would like to know how they are going to ensure accurate on-duty-not-driving time....or folks who have more than one job. That computer in the truck doesn't know when you clock in at the 2nd job, and your other employer's log isn't tied into your 1st employer's system to keep accurate records as you would on paper. In other words, you can literally work 2 jobs...10 hours at each...7 days per week....until you keel over. Carrier A won't have any record of the hours you worked at carrier B...unless you constantly go in and edit. Now those edits are able to be viewed, and if you edit TOO much, you can get in trouble. On paper? You just draw it up and submit it to each carrier. But hey, they are electronic, right? And we all know that means they are flawless.

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Government knows what's best for me.

Maybe the next president would stop all this stuff.

OK stop laughing.

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I called OOIDA,they told me if you run local,less than 100 miles you will not need a EOBR.I don't know if they know whats going on.I run a 250 mile radius,home ever day,I need 10 more years.I run a 1985 Superliner,E-9,I guess I can park it and get into my newer truck,a 1980 KW with a 400 Cummins.I will not buy a newer truck,I guess I can go to Mexico,cross the border,don't say a word and get the gov handouts.

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