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kscarbel2

When Freightliner Walked Volvo on a Leash – the US Market N10

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Nice stuff......thanks for sharing.

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Always had an interest of that unit. Thanks for the posts. Paul

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KSC

if the Volvo L4591 Titan Tiptop (photo in old thread) had entered the US market successfully in 1964 one wonders what would could have been...!!!!... it certainly changed the UK and Europe markets, some would say it dominated and maybe the descendant FH still does.

we had a great expression for the F86 operating at 32ton gross... "wouldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding", a gutless beast only matched by the Scania 80, but it was very light and had a great payload capacity that made a few companies a lot of money.

BC Mack

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I remember seeing a N model Volvo running around northern IL. Was a tractor hauling a end dump. That thing was always holding up traffic.

Seams a lot of bean counters like the Volvo brand. I was working for my former employer last week at a race track. Seams. 70% of the race haulers were late model Volvo sleeper cabs. Very few American made trucks were in the paddock

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KSC

if the Volvo L4591 Titan Tiptop (photo in old thread) had entered the US market successfully in 1964 one wonders what would could have been...!!!!... it certainly changed the UK and Europe markets, some would say it dominated and maybe the descendant FH still does.

we had a great expression for the F86 operating at 32ton gross... "wouldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding", a gutless beast only matched by the Scania 80, but it was very light and had a great payload capacity that made a few companies a lot of money.

BC Mack

The Titan Tiptop was inspired by the US market, but far from a success, the effort never got off the ground. And back then, the Volvo drivetrain was immature.

When Volvo first came over and would sign near anyone willing to take the franchise, they never sold many F86US in the US.

But when Freightliner came into the picture, a trusted name, the F6 and F7 began to sell. But Volvo was always behind Mack's Mid-Liner range, which by the mid eighties had become the most popular medium truck (COE) in the U.S. market.

I was thinking about you the other day when someone brought up the Seddon Atkinson 400 series......good truck in its day.

.

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It seemed to me the N10 was dropped to make way for the GMC Brigadier when it became part of the White/GMC line.

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It seemed to me the N10 was dropped to make way for the GMC Brigadier when it became part of the White/GMC line.

As I recall, 1987 was the last year the Brigadier was built solely by GM and badged as a GMC.

In 1988, the last year, the fleet favorite Brigadier was still built by GM in Pontiac but was marketed by the Volvo GM Heavy Truck Corp joint venture for that one year, and badged WhiteGMC.

Then it was effectively replaced by the horrible (my opinion) decontented White-based WG in 1989, which had been introduced in 1988.

I personally believe that the only reason Volvo agreed to sell the Brigadier in 1988 is because there was a lot of pressure from fleets.

There were a few Brigadiers titled as 1989 models, but I suspect they were produced in late 1988.

The WG was cheap, in EVERY sense of the word. But when the recession hit in the early nineties, a lot of fleets that had always purchased quality (Mack) rather than cheap trucks, such as Harwood Cochrane's Overnite Transportation, decided that cheap was suddenly right for them. So after a slow start, and blessed by the recession, the clumsy WG finally took off.

The N10 never competed with the Brigadier. Brigadiers ran 290 to 350 horsepower engines, while the N10 was limited in LTL on-road applications at 253hp. And the Brigadier was a bargain for what you got, a favorite with fleet accountants.

The N10 never sold well, not at all, but Volvo kept on hoping until they finally gave up. The Volvo Swedes absolutely hate admitting anytime they're wrong.

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I heard Brigadiers were built by GMC at their old Pontiac heavy truck plant until it closed in 1989. They were built alongside the earlier Cat 3208 powered Topkicks (and Kodiaks). When the new '530' series Topkick/Kodiak came out in late 1989 production moved to Janesville, WI.. The Brig. was indeed a very popular truck with a lot of fleets, particularly auto transporters. Agreed the WG was a cheap truck!

I remember one fleet in Southern California had a few N-10's. That was all I ever saw of those trucks.

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We had a N10, little underpowered but nice driving truck, had a pedal to push to make engine brake come, if you gave it fuel and pushed the engine brake you could stop traffic, made tremendous amounts of thick smoke and stopped all traffic behind you. Obama would eat his shorts if he saw that. just that feature alone made it fun to drive.

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The Titan Tiptop was inspired by the US market, but far from a success, the effort never got off the ground. And back then, the Volvo drivetrain was immature.

When Volvo first came over and would sign near anyone willing to take the franchise, they never sold many F86US in the US.

But when Freightliner came into the picture, a trusted name, the F6 and F7 began to sell. But Volvo was always behind Mack's Mid-Liner range, which by the mid eighties had become the most popular medium truck (COE) in the U.S. market.

I was thinking about you the other day when someone brought up the Seddon Atkinson 400 series......good truck in its day.

.

The tiptop was never seriously manufactured but became the F88 and F89, but with either 240 or 325hp it wasn't going to do too well over his side of the pond... it was the first of the era's mass produced trucks with a fully syncromesh gearbox, up to 16 speed, I found them very easy to drive and by 75/6 the 290hp UK special was in those days a "rocket ship" after an Atkinson Borderer with a Gardner...!!!

Volvo was a keen participant in the "club cab" with their F6/7 and Renault/Mack it did make a big dent into the American market.

S/A 400, and later varients, was in my opinion a well designed truck, not hard to fix, Motor Panels made a great cab, 335 Cummins was available but most settled for 250hp Cummins and a 9509A.. it made the boss money... the old discussion of the british motor industry could ensue, but everything was against the industry and the europeans won.

BC Mack

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