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kscarbel2

Those Ramirez Heavy Trucks

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Dina (http://www.bigmacktrucks.com/index.php?/topic/32420-dina-trucks-sa/) was by no means Mexico's only large heavy truckmaker. In addition to Pena and others, there was Ramirez.

In 1946, Mexican entrepreneur Gregorio Ramírez González opened a small trailer repair shop in the state of Nuevo León called Trailers de Monterrey.

González quickly encountered a demand from his customers for commercial trucks and buses leading him to refurb U.S. Army surplus trucks for civilian use.

His operation went on to evolve into Mexico’s first vehicle manufacturer, Grupo Industrial Ramirez (GIR, S.A.).

Group companies included IASA, IMMSA, Autobuses Sultana and Trailers y Tractocamiones Ramírez, which became leaders in their business segments resulting from joint ventures with Ford, General Motors, Nissan, White and Italian farm tractor maker SAME.

In 1952, Trailers de Monterrey began producing buses utilizing General Motors drivetrains under the Sultana brand. Like Dina, the company went on to become a massive bus and coach manufacturer.

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In 1959, the company launched its first heavy truck range under the Ramirez brand. These 4x2 configuration trucks were sold under the designations R-12, R-15 and R-18.

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In 1963, the R18-2D 6x4 tractor was launched. Later, a vocational range was introduced.

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When German carmaker Borgward filed for bankruptcy in 1963, Ramirez purchased the technology and production machinery for the Borgward Isabella and P100 and began production in Monterrey, Mexico.

In 1964, Industria Automotriz S.A. was established for the production of parts and components. That same year, Berg de Mexico S.A was established for the production of commercial truck air brake components (renamed Industrias Vortec S.A. in 1982).

The company also produced International Harvester Scout (badged as the Ramírez "Rural 750"), “Travelall” utility trucks and “Light Line” pickup trucks under license.

During the 1970s. the truckmaker produced a COE model at the special request of the Bimbo* Bread Company.

In 1981, Trailers de Monterrey upgraded its truck assembly line with assistance from The Budd Company.

* Mexico's Bimbo Group is yet another global player that has proven to be more savvy in America than our own, The group over the years has acquired Sara Lee's bakery business and the following brands: Arnold, Ball Park, Boboli, Brownberry, Cinnabon Bread, EarthGrains, Entenmann’s, Francisco, Freihofer’s, Marinela, Milton’s Bread, Mrs Bairds, Oroweat, Roman Meal, Sara Lee, Stroehmann, Sun-Maid Bread, Thomas’ and Tia Rosa. All these famous brands........now Mexican owned.

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Great info. I've seen pics of their trucks on the web here and there but never bothered to do any reaearch.

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They look like cabover cabs mated to a conventional front end :o

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The first abnd second gemeration units are nice looking trucks. Thanks for the post! Paul

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Saw a few of those over the years in California.  Rumor was the conventional cab was wide and the doors had bulges in them so the driver could sleep across the seats!  

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Well there's something I have never seen, nor even heard of.

 

Thanks for posting more interesting stuff kscarbel2

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