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Lanova engine rebuild


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Nice work. You are really doing things correct and to last.

What is the bore diameter and length of stroke on the engine? Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Nice work. You are really doing things correct and to last.

What is the bore diameter and length of stroke on the engine? Paul

Paul,

I'm not young enough to feel the need of fixing when got on the road. And hate to find out I "should do" something when I "could do".

The bore/stroke is 4-3/8 by 5-3/4.

Actual sleeves are long, here's the draving of castings I requested when ordering.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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Vlad, have you ever used dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) to freeze the liners (shrinks them) before you pressed them into a block? I remember my father doing this when he did a cylinder kit (in-frame) on one of his F-Models and it worked like a charm. He was able to put the liner in by just tapping it with a small dead-blow mallet and a block of soft wood.

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TWO STROKES ARE FOR GARDEN TOOLS

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Vlad, have you ever used dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) to freeze the liners (shrinks them) before you pressed them into a block? I remember my father doing this when he did a cylinder kit (in-frame) on one of his F-Models and it worked like a charm. He was able to put the liner in by just tapping it with a small dead-blow mallet and a block of soft wood.

We used to just put the sleeves in an old freezer overnite.

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Vlad, have you ever used dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) to freeze the liners (shrinks them) before you pressed them into a block? I remember my father doing this when he did a cylinder kit (in-frame) on one of his F-Models and it worked like a charm. He was able to put the liner in by just tapping it with a small dead-blow mallet and a block of soft wood.

Randy, no I didn't. Original manual for this engine tells just "press out" and "press in". With a portable press using stock bottle jack.

So I measured carefully the original liners and the bores in the block. Than gave the figures to the shop guy. He couldn't keep the size from liner to other absolutely sharp although the bores had some difference either. So I "played" with new sleeves placing them with about equal tight.

I would use thermo effect but those parts were long and needed a while to be in place. So they would balance temperatures being in contact so long.

And as it seems to me, newer Mack engines such as E6 have much slighter fit in a block. At least I was told so from the man who owned my R and made inframe overhaul.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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  • 3 weeks later...

Paul, that wasn't the best way to cast the liners because it was not a centrifugal casting and some minor cavits came on the surface after honing. Not too big and too many though. I could go another way ordering custom pistons. Some places offer it overhere although I'm not shure how they are really solid to not fall apart inside a running engine. I've heard this kind of stories.

Part 2 of the story.

After the block was machined I closed it all over the holes with plywood covers and put the front and other original covers with temporary gaskets on. Than sandblasted it and painted. Made the same to the other parts.

It was a usual combo of self-etching primer, second common primer and than acrilic paint mixed with matt additive 30:70. So just 30% of paint and 70% of matt. This makes a smooth matt surface you use to see on military vehicles.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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Allowing the paint to set up well I payed attention to the crank shaft. It had some rust as said above so I got it to the shop. They ground the mains off to the second stage, the size I found the bearing shells for. Having no shells for the central journal I kept it standard. It had no damage so it was possible. Shop guy was not too lucky about it. He spent about 40 minutes setting the shaft into the lathe. It was not almost a lathe but the crank grinding machine.

After he had the shaft almost centered he ground it over in about 10 minutes or less.

A couple of days were spent filing the piston rings to obtain the correct gap. Not a great trouble but there were 30 rings at all and I wanted to do it well.

There was one more point in that story I wanted to pass buy with no doubt. The rear crank seal.

The original one was of the old wire style and I knew it might be leaky. So the plan was to go to a modern seal.

I had the rear cover off E6-350 engine and found out it could be fit to my block easily (40 years of difference!).

It needed though to be cutted off from the inside diameter to clear up a flange on the original Lanova crankshaft. I could cut the flange but preferred to modify the cap wich might be swapped easily if something goes wrong. The other trouble was the size of the shaft journal at the seal area. Econodyne seal has larger ID.

I made the steel sleeve to press on the shaft and get the correct size to work with E6/E7 part. Bought E7 teflon seal from ebay and made a steel part to press that seal in place. Not almost the same as Mack tool but the steel cap of the size to drive the seal in.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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Gee! After it is all redone and detailed I put it in my living room as a piece of art work!! Excellent work on it. Paul

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"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Gee! After it is all redone and detailed I put it in my living room as a piece of art work!! Excellent work on it. Paul

That is a real sorrow Paul. Due to its weight it's much easier to get every thing from the living room into the shop :D

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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  • 2 weeks later...

They look better than new! Does the Water Pump have a Grease fitting on it? Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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