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Clutch Installation And Alignment On Multi Disk Clutch

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I'm trying to put the clutch back on the E9 but my paint marks for alignment have become somewhat less than legible from the parts washer. I can see my marks for the flywheel and backing plates but not for the disks. I don't want to put this together the wrong way.

What is the correct alignment of the 2 disks? Inline, slightly offset or completely offset?

I know that the splines must be aligned to slide back onto the transmission input shaft and I've already built an alignment tool to get them centered.

Once this is set right, I can put the motor back in.

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Align the discs as close to each other as the splines will allow...

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Align the discs as close to each other as the splines will allow...

Thanks, Maxville. That what I thought was right, but I was unsure. It's much easier to make sure than pull the engine again after realizing there is a problem!

For those who need ideas on an easy engine pulling unit, see the enclosed photo. My forks are spread approximately 15 inches - the same width as the lift rings on the motor. I've slid a 6" x 6" steel tube over the one fork to provide the required reach to the back ring. A cross piece at the end of the tube ensures that the load won't jump off of the end of the tube. There are two pieces of 2x4 stacked below the fork at the base of the 6x6 tube to keep it from tilting too far down. I also secure at least one lift ring with a tie back anchor strap so that the whole load can not slide forward and off of the forks. It takes a little throttle to lift this motor but the ride is solid and this is the easiest method I know of to pull or install a motor when working alone as I usually do.post-1547-1193619070_thumb.jpg

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I see ya have the robert bosch pump did you set the valves on the v mark?

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I see ya have the robert bosch pump did you set the valves on the v mark?

Not yet but before it is started, it will be.

Another tip for clutch alignment: the width of the spline was about 2 paint stirring sticks in width. I had already cut a pilot shaft out of wood on the lathe but I did not want to take the time to make splines. After the pilot was inserted through the disks, I clipped (with wire cutter dikes) two strips from an old paint stirring stick and drove those into the spline to align the two disks. Drive the pieces in from the flywheel side. Let them be a tight fit on the driven in side and clip off any excess. You only need to get one spline groove aligned. Secure the clutch flywheel to the spring plate with a couple of wire ties. Use 2 long bolts with the heads cut off as alignment pins to seat the assembly. Once the bolts are started on the spring plate, cut and remove the wire ties while the assembly is still loose. Tighten the spring plate and when the pilot shaft is pulled out, the pieces of the stir stick will fall down and can be blown out with an air hose.

After this is completed, stab the motor to the tranny and bolt it down!

About 2 hours later, the motor is mounted back into the truck. Now to start with the hoses, wiring & other connections.

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Not yet but before it is started, it will be.

Another tip for clutch alignment: the width of the spline was about 2 paint stirring sticks in width. I had already cut a pilot shaft out of wood on the lathe but I did not want to take the time to make splines. After the pilot was inserted through the disks, I clipped (with wire cutter dikes) two strips from an old paint stirring stick and drove those into the spline to align the two disks. Drive the pieces in from the flywheel side. Let them be a tight fit on the driven in side and clip off any excess. You only need to get one spline groove aligned. Secure the clutch flywheel to the spring plate with a couple of wire ties. Use 2 long bolts with the heads cut off as alignment pins to seat the assembly. Once the bolts are started on the spring plate, cut and remove the wire ties while the assembly is still loose. Tighten the spring plate and when the pilot shaft is pulled out, the pieces of the stir stick will fall down and can be blown out with an air hose.

After this is completed, stab the motor to the tranny and bolt it down!

About 2 hours later, the motor is mounted back into the truck. Now to start with the hoses, wiring & other connections.

I've used the input shaft from a roadranger transmission, (two inch) for years as a line up tool. Works flawlessly.

Rob

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I've used the input shaft from a roadranger transmission, (two inch) for years as a line up tool. Works flawlessly.

Rob

THAT is by far the best and easiest way to do it. I did not have the parts laying around so I manufactured what I needed. Wood is easier and faster to cut than steel and works fine as an alignment shaft.

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