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Hi all,

I don't know if you remember me, but I am the guy who posted pictures and story of popping a wheelie in my '65 b75.

Well, I've now got a 74 R series with a log self-loader that has got some engine troubles. It's got a Cummins in it and it smokes a lot. The smoke doesn't go away after extensive warm up. Black on acceleration and then lots of whiteish blue and smells like diesel. SO, that made me suspect a wet cylinder. I took temp readings of all 6 and the back one is a full 100 degrees cooler than the rest. Seems like the likely problem. Where do I go from here?

post-2359-1249701445_thumb.jpg

1965 Mack B-74, dump

1974 Mack R, logging w/Prentice self-loader

www.somewhereonthemountain.blogspot.com

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Hi all,

I don't know if you remember me, but I am the guy who posted pictures and story of popping a wheelie in my '65 b75.

Well, I've now got a 74 R series with a log self-loader that has got some engine troubles. It's got a Cummins in it and it smokes a lot. The smoke doesn't go away after extensive warm up. Black on acceleration and then lots of whiteish blue and smells like diesel. SO, that made me suspect a wet cylinder. I took temp readings of all 6 and the back one is a full 100 degrees cooler than the rest. Seems like the likely problem. Where do I go from here?

Just prior to jerking that log loader off and sending it to me I would pull the injection nozzles and start with a compression test of the engine to verify the cylinder integrity. When the engine is running and up to temp have you looked into the radiator to see if it is bubbling, or has oil in the coolant? I don't know that much about Cummins engines but the basics still apply no matter what the brand.

If your engine compression looks to be even, balanced, and within spec, major mechanical parts can be ruled out. It is entirely possible that you have a dripping injector. You did not mention if the engine runs well or has a slight miss, or dead miss on one cylinder.

You may have an engine that is ready for an inframe rebuild also.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Just prior to jerking that log loader off and sending it to me I would pull the injection nozzles and start with a compression test of the engine to verify the cylinder integrity.

You did not mention if the engine runs well or has a slight miss, or dead miss on one cylinder.

Rob

It seems to run pretty darn well with no missing. I'll start with a compression test. How would I know if there's a dripping injector?

ah, the log loader. One ofthe reasons I bought the truck. The loader IS coming off, but only because it's going on my sea mule tug boat that I am restoring. And then this Mack will be used to haul the boat in and out of the water. Though, since the boat is 60,000 lbs, that won't happen all that often!

Check out www.seamule.blogspot.com

Edited by martinf

1965 Mack B-74, dump

1974 Mack R, logging w/Prentice self-loader

www.somewhereonthemountain.blogspot.com

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It seems to run pretty darn well with no missing. I'll start with a compression test. How would I know if there's a dripping injector?

ah, the log loader. One ofthe reasons I bought the truck. The loader IS coming off, but only because it's going on my sea mule tug boat that I am restoring. And then this Mack will be used to haul the boat in and out of the water. Though, since the boat is 60,000 lbs, that won't happen all that often!

Check out www.seamule.blogspot.com

A lot of times the exhaust will have a slight "pop" in the tone followed by a short blast of smoke from 100% unburnt fuel. If your compression checks out alright I would send the injectors into the shop and have them calibrated/rebuilt while they were out.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Hi all,

I don't know if you remember me, but I am the guy who posted pictures and story of popping a wheelie in my '65 b75.

Well, I've now got a 74 R series with a log self-loader that has got some engine troubles. It's got a Cummins in it and it smokes a lot. The smoke doesn't go away after extensive warm up. Black on acceleration and then lots of whiteish blue and smells like diesel. SO, that made me suspect a wet cylinder. I took temp readings of all 6 and the back one is a full 100 degrees cooler than the rest. Seems like the likely problem. Where do I go from here?

So far you have done well, by isolating the cold cylinder. Good work. You may find either a collapsed injector plunger, or maybe a missing injector tip. If you are checking compression you have to pull the injectors anyway, so start with #6. First and formost you need to determine the CPL of your engine, as it will make a huge difference when resetting the injectors. Some set on the inner base circle, some on the outer base circle. A collapsed plunger will be easy to spot, as the link [short rod] opposite the push tube on the injector rocker arm will be loose. Clean the assessory drive pulley and timing pointer to find the timing marks, and bar the engine over to A, or 1-6VS. If both valves are closed on #6 you are ready to start. Remove injectors by firing order, TOP STOP INJECTORS DO NOT ADJUST BY FIRING ORDER. You should be able to remove the injector with the rocker box housing in place, by backing the adjuster off and laying the push tube to one side or removing it. Jake housings have to come off. Cummins push tubes are fairly heavy. any time you have one out of the engine, drop it so that it lands flat, on a concrete floor. Listen for a ring, if you hear a thud, pitch it and get another. It has oil in it, and it WILL hydraulic and break the ball end off.

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If you are checking compression you have to pull the injectors anyway, so start with #6. First and formost you need to determine the CPL of your engine, as it will make a huge difference when resetting the injectors.

Stupid question time: what does CPL stand for?

thanks for all the great info, martin

1965 Mack B-74, dump

1974 Mack R, logging w/Prentice self-loader

www.somewhereonthemountain.blogspot.com

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Stupid question time: what does CPL stand for?

thanks for all the great info, martin

Not stupid at all CPL stands for Control Parts List. It s a summery of the parts that an engine was assembled with. You should find it on a tag riveted to the engine case, just below the assessory drive pulley. Fuel pumps, originally had a tag also, on the top close to where it bolts to the compressor. The engine # is found just below the rear cyl head on the drivers side, and can yeild a CPL # by calling Cummins. That only holds true if the engine has never been updated. These engines are fairly simple. If you can work on an inline 6 cyl chevy, you can work on an early Cummins. One good thing about them is that the collective parts that make up the engine are stamped with the part number. The CPL is important to you if you do not know the truck's history for the last 35 years. It could have a newer engine. Another distinction is whether it is a small cam or big cam engine, which is determined by looking at the cam followers bolted to the drivers side of the crankcase.

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It seems to run pretty darn well with no missing. I'll start with a compression test. How would I know if there's a dripping injector?

ah, the log loader. One ofthe reasons I bought the truck. The loader IS coming off, but only because it's going on my sea mule tug boat that I am restoring. And then this Mack will be used to haul the boat in and out of the water. Though, since the boat is 60,000 lbs, that won't happen all that often!

Check out www.seamule.blogspot.com

don't pay any attention to Rob, he wants everything he sees- they don't even have logs in Illinois anyway, just corn.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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don't pay any attention to Rob, he wants everything he sees- they don't even have logs in Illinois anyway, just corn.

Be careful there Martin, don't be swayed by the comments with an underlying motive. As you can see Other Dog wants that loader too, but remember; I called first dibs.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Be careful there Martin, don't be swayed by the comments with an underlying motive. As you can see Other Dog wants that loader too, but remember; I called first dibs.

Rob

One of my best friends had recently bought out the rolling stock of a small LP gas co, that had gone out of business. On of the units had a 16 foot steel flat bed and a nice hydraulic boom. He pulled the flatbed off and sold the truck for almost as much as he gave for the whole bunch. As he was telling me about selling the truck he suddenly exclaimed, dammit, I should have kept that truck, added a winch, and I could have loaded logs with it. I had to remind him, hey man I am 66, you just turned 62, and our logging and pulpwood days are over with. I can see why you might want the loader though, you could stack your collection of yesteryear items in a very tight 16 ft. high circle around you while sleeping. Gather all the ladders up first though, all the kitchen knives too.

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maybe the corn in Illinois is so big you do need a knuckle boom to lift it. We're not getting any younger, eh? (that's Canadian).

When I was in high school and it was corn picking time in the fall Daddy would have 2 wagon loads of corn setting at the barn for me and my older brother to unload when we got home from school. He would unload one, i'd unload the other one. Off the wagon and into a little door in the side of the barn- with a shovel. Not even a grain scoop, a big shovel.

All true. It was great.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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One of my best friends had recently bought out the rolling stock of a small LP gas co, that had gone out of business. On of the units had a 16 foot steel flat bed and a nice hydraulic boom. He pulled the flatbed off and sold the truck for almost as much as he gave for the whole bunch. As he was telling me about selling the truck he suddenly exclaimed, dammit, I should have kept that truck, added a winch, and I could have loaded logs with it. I had to remind him, hey man I am 66, you just turned 62, and our logging and pulpwood days are over with. I can see why you might want the loader though, you could stack your collection of yesteryear items in a very tight 16 ft. high circle around you while sleeping. Gather all the ladders up first though, all the kitchen knives too.

Ah,,,logs,,,pulpwood,,,quotas,,,,chiggers,,,,ticks,,,wonderful, humid 105 degree days in east texas woods between hills, no pesky wind to bother you, oops, left out sweat flies and copperheads too,,,lol,,,wonderful memories (really wouldnt trade them for nothing, good character builders)

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Good friends of mine build sawmill equipment here and a knuckleboom crane could be very handy to have around. My boom crane truck works well but I really could use more capacity.

I used to unload corn wagons, and buck bales a lot when I was younger. The way it was around here was that those willing to work always had money in their pocket.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Good friends of mine build sawmill equipment here and a knuckleboom crane could be very handy to have around. My boom crane truck works well but I really could use more capacity.

I used to unload corn wagons, and buck bales a lot when I was younger. The way it was around here was that those willing to work always had money in their pocket.

Rob

shoot!..good answer...foiled again-my theory doesn't hold water...Rob is truly one of the greatest living Americans.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Ah,,,logs,,,pulpwood,,,quotas,,,,chiggers,,,,ticks,,,wonderful, humid 105 degree days in east texas woods between hills, no pesky wind to bother you, oops, left out sweat flies and copperheads too,,,lol,,,wonderful memories (really wouldnt trade them for nothing, good character builders)

You forgot to mention stuck, broke down, and out of wood.

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Good friends of mine build sawmill equipment here and a knuckleboom crane could be very handy to have around. My boom crane truck works well but I really could use more capacity.

Out here in the Pacific NW these log self-loaders are pretty common. I'll be using mine in a fairly unusual way: I'm mounting it on a WWII barge boat that I am restoring. 60,000 lbs of 1/4" steel 40' long and 13' wide with two Chrystler straight 8 engines spinning two 54" propellers. The Prentice log loader will be on the deck towards the front where I'll be picking up logs and moving/stashing them around for the Forest Service. I'm doing this on the lake I live on, 60 miles long, half-mile long and 1500 ft deep. I'm not so much trying to make a lot of money--just have somebody else paying for my fule while I motor around this incredible lake.

I'm hoping that the Mack will work out for me. It's got a 20 speed and that, coupled with a low boy, aught to work fine to pull my boat in and out of the lake.

I've got more questions for you guys about other issues regarding this project, but, for now I gotta figure out this wet cylinder thing.

~martin

info about this project at www.seamule.blogspot.com

1965 Mack B-74, dump

1974 Mack R, logging w/Prentice self-loader

www.somewhereonthemountain.blogspot.com

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Out here in the Pacific NW these log self-loaders are pretty common. I'll be using mine in a fairly unusual way: I'm mounting it on a WWII barge boat that I am restoring. 60,000 lbs of 1/4" steel 40' long and 13' wide with two Chrystler straight 8 engines spinning two 54" propellers. The Prentice log loader will be on the deck towards the front where I'll be picking up logs and moving/stashing them around for the Forest Service. I'm doing this on the lake I live on, 60 miles long, half-mile long and 1500 ft deep. I'm not so much trying to make a lot of money--just have somebody else paying for my fule while I motor around this incredible lake.

I'm hoping that the Mack will work out for me. It's got a 20 speed and that, coupled with a low boy, aught to work fine to pull my boat in and out of the lake.

I've got more questions for you guys about other issues regarding this project, but, for now I gotta figure out this wet cylinder thing.

~martin

info about this project at www.seamule.blogspot.com

1500' deep?..geez-and I wear a life jacket in the shower!

I went to Puyallup once.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Out here in the Pacific NW these log self-loaders are pretty common. I'll be using mine in a fairly unusual way: I'm mounting it on a WWII barge boat that I am restoring. 60,000 lbs of 1/4" steel 40' long and 13' wide with two Chrystler straight 8 engines spinning two 54" propellers. The Prentice log loader will be on the deck towards the front where I'll be picking up logs and moving/stashing them around for the Forest Service. I'm doing this on the lake I live on, 60 miles long, half-mile long and 1500 ft deep. I'm not so much trying to make a lot of money--just have somebody else paying for my fule while I motor around this incredible lake.

I'm hoping that the Mack will work out for me. It's got a 20 speed and that, coupled with a low boy, aught to work fine to pull my boat in and out of the lake.

I've got more questions for you guys about other issues regarding this project, but, for now I gotta figure out this wet cylinder thing.

~martin

info about this project at www.seamule.blogspot.com

I'd lay odds that you will need to set a large concrete block on the truck frame above the drive tires to pull that much weight up an incline for traction. It is amazing how little "tractive effort" is transferred to the ground with a tandem that does not have much downward weight; Especially when you take into account algae, or slime that grows on the water approaches.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Ah,,,logs,,,pulpwood,,,quotas,,,,chiggers,,,,ticks,,,wonderful, humid 105 degree days in east texas woods between hills, no pesky wind to bother you, oops, left out sweat flies and copperheads too,,,lol,,,wonderful memories (really wouldnt trade them for nothing, good character builders)

The old saying about Texas is that it is so big, that if you get out and drive a while, you will find a part of it that you really like. I like just about all of it, including the pine woods around Nacogdoches. I used to love to hear Bob Murphy spin his tall tales about life in the pine woods.

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