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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/24/2019 in all areas

  1. 9 points
  2. 7 points
    Fine looking farm truck!
  3. 6 points
  4. 5 points
    Has been upgraded with drive train from early 60's B-61 around 25 years ago 711 diesel with quadruplex power steering maxi brakes pintle hook and 2" receiver hitch with glad hands on rear good box and hoist solid cab, interior and headliner in good condition good set of fenders and many other extra parts included, as well as documentation from the Mack Museum not museum quality but in very good condition (will need tie rod ends to pass inspection) Have owned this truck for nearly 6 years and still enjoy driving it every chance I get but unfortunately I must let it go. $8,000 PM for more info and pics
  5. 5 points
  6. 4 points
    First year for the K5 Blazer in the GM lineup.
  7. 4 points
    Clearly a black and white situation.
  8. 4 points
    Now I just need the rest of the truck!
  9. 3 points
    1987 Mack Superliner ad with "Mack diesels up to 500 HP V8 - our Whispering Giant".
  10. 3 points
    Block truck with a Thermodyne 300 Plus under the hood.
  11. 2 points
    A 1923 Mack AC with a 1949 Mack FW and a 1947 Sterling HC 175 on damp spring morning in 2005.
  12. 2 points
  13. 2 points
    With the price of scrap being close to zero, after the cost of cutting them up and trucking to the scrap yard, you will have pretty much no money for the effort. Good thinking! Have a nice day.
  14. 2 points
    In the weeds and not available.
  15. 2 points
    Two super Superliners from 2019 Metro-Jersey show in Augusta, NJ.
  16. 2 points
    This is a photo from my collection. It shows the set-back MH chassis with RH drive at the ED&TC.
  17. 2 points
    This is a photo from my collection. It shows the hood to cowl joint following the contour of the R-model style cowl.
  18. 2 points
    http://www.bigmacktrucks.com/topic/43658-21977-over-drive-cruiseliner-report/#comment-321468 The Cruise-Liner was a big step forward for Mack Western. It was the result of west coast truck engineers that Mack had hired. In theory, they could give us a leap forward with a true west coast design. In the eyes of many in headquarters, the original Hayward designed/produced Cruise-Liner was an engineering disaster. The freedom given the west coast engineers was revoked, and the 2nd gen Cruise-Liner was created in Allentown (fixing many of the shortcomings). The MH Ultra-Liner restored Mack's reputation as a designer of well-engineered COEs. The axle-mounted steering arrangement was a huge mistake. The telescoping steering shaft wore out prematurely (we sold thousands of replacements, averaging 2-3 over the life of a truck), as did the steering gears and pitman arms, becoming strong sellers in the parts department. (the output shaft splines and pitman arm splines were constantly wallowed out owing to the nature of the stupid design). The disconnecting (ball and socket) shift linkage, specifically the gears, rails, bushings and seals in the tower, also had unacceptably short life (the average truck's shift tower was rebuilt at least 3 times over its life). It was a terrible design, whereas the shift linkage on the MH Ultra-Liner was superb. I did prefer the original first generation Cruise-Liner instrument panel over the simplified second generation, however the center console had all the aesthetics of a plastic box. It was excessively large and the top (with the vents) frequently cracked and required replacement, a problem resolved with the second generation (It's pretty embarrassing when west coast Mack dealers have console covers hanging in their show room because they're such strong sellers). And then you had those expensive rubber riv-nuts that retained the grille constantly falling out. Here it is year 2016 and I couldn't possibly forget the part number, 68RU29301P5, because it was a hot issue. The Trico pantograph windshield wiper arms and their transmissions didn't hold up. All of these issues were covered in Mack Service Bulletins.............there were more service bulletins on the WS/WL Cruise-Liner than any other single model in the history of Mack Trucks. I found the cab was "beat" less with the 10,500lb front suspension. But dealers were accustomed to ordering the 12,000 front suspension, as they had for years with the heavier steel-cabbed F-model. The work ethic of the employees at the Hayward plant was terrible. They were "California casual" about showing up for work......one never knew how many people were coming in. The Allentown people sent out there were in constant frustration. The workers would install cab screws with their power tools until the threads were stripped. They didn't care. The idea of setting up a west coast plant for west coast truck production was logical. However, there was a people problem. This is all why the plant was closed, and the 2nd gen Cruise-Liner was built at Macungie.......with significantly better quality. I believe Peterbilt closed its plant at nearby Newark, California plant in 1986 for the same reason, issues with assembly quality. Caterpillar, Ford, GM and International Harvester abandoned the Bay Area as well.
  19. 1 point
    A first year 1939 Pete and a extremely rare bird a 1944 KW built during the war in Yakima, Wa. KW's built during WWII are very rare, the Seattle factory was used by Boeing to build air craft so the truck factory was moved to Yakima. Very limited production during the war years, this is the only war bird I have ever seen. The federal is a X13 model.
  20. 1 point
    Probably still better than working a horse and wagon all day!
  21. 1 point
    This pusher may be sitting a spell due to the warm temps and rain this weekend. Not much snow in the forecast around here.
  22. 1 point
    1974 Brockway 359LL log truck. No fake patina here!!!
  23. 1 point
    Ready for the tough stuff.
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
    You begin here: https://www.fordtrucksglobal.com/ ......and click on "Choose your country": https://www.fordtrucksglobal.com/select-languages Then for your purposes, click on one of the countries with an English (EN) version of that website.
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    https://www.ownerdriver.com.au/industry-news/1910/return-of-the-mack
  28. 1 point
    gr8 pix guys keep m cumm n here B a few Australian V: of the Mack Superliner Thanx Mr Google cya
  29. 1 point
    A 3208 is fully rebuildable.i have did a few back when.We always bored the block and installed dry sleeves and used standard pistons.The 1100 series was not rebuildable.
  30. 1 point
    Well, this makes me feel pretty good about the progress on this cab. Everything lines up and it's almost all in one color, instead of the faded paint, primer and rust.
  31. 1 point
    Thanks. Yes, have a tri-axle pony and a tri-axle tag float also. This is the unit this one replaced. Truck is legal for 80,000 pounds gross here and 140,000 with pony.
  32. 1 point
    jdfordhd 217 Posted May 12 Been a while since I posted so I thought ya'll needed to know I still own it. Hauling my 700K this week. My Super Liner and me are celebrating 30 years together.! And she is still looking fantastic That Superliner is a real credit to you and the care you have given to it I recall some pics you shared when you bought it and it's changes over the years At a guess that must have been 25th anniversary Great stuff and more pics please Paul
  33. 1 point
    Been a while since I posted so I thought ya'll needed to know I still own it. Hauling my 700K this week. My Super Liner and me are celebrating 30 years together.!
  34. 1 point
    Out playing in the rain.
  35. 1 point
    1976 Brockway utilizing a 3408 CAT motor.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    id take those battery boxes off and throw them in the scrap aluminum pile and put the eastern ones on with the X on the front. only thing those are good for is fallin on your ass when the cover slips off. otherwise that truck is such a honey. bias ply tires and all.
  38. 1 point
    In this picture? M746 (aka. XM746, HET-70) Designed by Chrysler in cooperation with West Germany's Faun Werke, but Ward La France was low bidder. . .
  39. 1 point
    Sorry you missed on a fine looking ride. That is actually a chrome soft nose. A hard nose LJ would look like this.
  40. 1 point
    That would be an MS-250 w/air over hydaulic brakes and they are VERY expensive to maintain/repair. I would pass on the truck over this setup myself. The full air brake trucks, (MS/CS-300 series were very reliable minus the Renault air compressor mounted far too close to the exhaust pipe in the CS-300 series baking the compressor head and causing valve problems, (IMO) which were usually sticking open valves precluding pressure buildup.
  41. 1 point
    Finally got it together this weekend. New seal, races, bearings, drum and shoe and spring kit. The log truck stanchions came in handy for the chain fall. I am a 1 man team and it worked slick. No leaks so I would say that ones done. Guess I will start checking the others when time allows. thanks for the input all.
  42. 1 point
    Here's one. I guess it did make it into production. Mack Trucks Australia generally did things their own way. Perhaps the US experience with the shortcomings of the early Cruise-Liners and Super-Liner led them to adopt the tried and tested R model frame for their Cruise Liner, Superliner 1 and 2 and later, the MH Ultraliner. The Australian Value-Liner was also a completely different beast from the US one, again being based on the R model frame. Perhaps the set back axle MH is a kind of COE equivalent of the Aussie Value-Liner which also had a set back front axle.
  43. 1 point
    I agree with you and Dave. I've never swallowed the missing link theory either. If you really want to see the origins of the Super-Liner you need to look at the Cruise-Liner. The first generation Super-Liner is essentially a Cruise-Liner frame with an R model cab and a new hood. The key feature of this frame was the bolt on drop frame at the front which enabled the mounting of big wide radiators and the high hp motors which needed the cooling. Apart from that, the rest of the frame looks like it was pretty much carried over from the RL/RS models. Fittings such as cab mounts, fuel tanks, battery boxes and their brackets all look the same as those on late production RS/RL models and I believe the frame rail section dimensions were the same. I think this makes the Super-Liner the logical evolution of the Mack Western product line and any similarity with the Brockway designs is largely down to the use of the same cab shell. I guess to find out who designed it you would have to look at who was in key design roles at Hayward in the mid 70's. The second generation Super-Liner was a different beast. It had an entirely different frame which it shared with the earlier MH cabover. I think that Mack Western had ceased to exist by the time it came out so the Super-Liner 2 was an Eastern product. By all accounts, the Mk 2 was a much better truck than it's predecessor but, from a layman's view, I still prefer the look of the original with it's round headlights.
  44. 1 point
    First Brockway made both the 761 set back front axle and the 760 set forward axle so the new "Super Liner" truck could have been built either or both ways. By 1975-6 you could get a Brockway with a glass tilt hood. There are some around.. Second Sheller Globe made these cabs as well as the R model, even though it looks like a R model cab there were some differences, especially in the cowl area and they are not totally interchangeable.. By the time of Paul's pictures the long square hood was already built and Brockway was playing mostly with headlights,grilles and bumpers. Look at that straight on picture the headlights are different sided to side. Third one of the main reasons Mack closed Brockway was labor problems. The wheels at the union put the workers out on strike even though the workers were willing to work without a contract til things could be settled.
  45. 1 point
    i'm not real tall but weigh 400 lbs and I fit in my Superliner just fine.
  46. 1 point
    It is really a big challenge in this part of the world to get a trained or certified mack technician. This has made it too frustrating that many people are dumping their mack trucks because the challenge of keeping mack truck running here is much. I like venturing where others has backed out cos I know it is a matter of knowledge. I do hope bigmacktrucks will be a wonderful resource. I don't intend to quit mack.
  47. 1 point
    44 rears of course came standard with an automatic inter-axle power divider. An air-actuated inter-axle power divider "lockout" was a factory option. In addition, an "inter-wheel" power divider was also available. With this option, rather than the front/rear carriers being CRDPC92/CRD93, they'd be CRD921/CRD931. So with the combination of the two options, your rear bogie would be driving at all four corners for enhanced off-highway mobility.
  48. 1 point
    Ok here we go installing a windshield for a Mack B61. This project costs approximately $425 I had one side of the windshield that was still intact so when I removed everything this past spring I set the glass aside. Went to the local glass shop and had two new pieces cut and a side door glass total $159 with tax. New gasket from Watts $268 with shipping ( used my BMT discount) Stopped back by the glass shop after got the gasket to match up locking strip I bought 12 feet for $7 old one looks smaller just dried out. Old center strip as you can see not much left to it. Had new one made cost $10, Mike put the bend in it same as the old one. Stopped by Orileys and spent $15 on the tool and $23 on 3m Strips Getting started- I applied the butyl strips along the pinch welds, this stuff is really sticky so watch out. Put the gasket on starting in the top center working your way around both the left and right sides. Don't get carried away take you time, as you need the center bar to be centered and with the 3M strips it is hard to move the gasket once it is pushed on. I think a person would catch heck trying to remove and reset. Also with the stick strips you need to be careful as the gasket has a tendency to stick closed. I used a flat tip screw driver that is bent like a J to assist with keeping it open. After setting the gasket make sure the center strip and the cap/cover strip is in place. I loosely screwed it together to help with moving for when I slide in the glass. TIP --You can install and remove the center strip that goes in the gasket before the glass is installed and it actually makes it easier to set the perimeter gasket. I used bubble juice as the lubricant in a spray bottle, it sprays and works well, best of all it is cheap we buy it by the gallon at the dollar store for the kids maybe a $1gallon. It works way better than trying to mix dish soap and water like I have done in the past. I used about half a spray bottle. Wet the gasket on which ever side you want to start on, my fenders are still off so it was easy access. Carefully climb up and orientate the glass to match the opening push the glass into the center strip. Using a wide dull screwdriver or similar tool start near the center and push the gasket out from the inside. The gasket will catch on the edge of the glass and hold it. I installed both sides of the windshield by myself. I held the glass at the lower corner and pushed into the center and flat to the gasket. Make sure to keep the gasket lube during this process. Once the gasket is around the piece of glass you can apply slight pressure to adjust the glass and push into the opening. Repeat the same process on the other side. Once the glass is installed tighten up the center strip screws. Start at the top center using your tool or screw driver, lube the gasket and start the install of the locking strip. As you move all the way around gasket it will go smoothly if you keep it well lubed and rotating or twisting the tool back and forth while maintaining about a 40 degree angle pushing forward. Once at the end or start point again trim, I used my razor knife and cut at an angle and but it up to the other end. Move to the center strip now and with a square end start at the top just below were the other ends are and using the same technique work the locking strip down. The gasket has a pocket at the bottom end and once there cut off at an angle and push the end in the the pocket. That's it other than clean up and wiping the windows. By now my son was home so he gave it a shot and helped me with the rest of the install. I used the Lisle tool model 47000. I picked that tool because it came with additional tips. A single tip tool can cost the same as this one or more. I have done it both ways with a modified screw driver and the tool and by far the tool is worth the expense.
  49. 1 point
    Nice truck. I bought the H613T picture below from Ralph G. Smith Horse Transportation this summer. It is serial number 1001, the first of 3 H61's built with a turbo. Unfortunately it has been replaced with a naturally aspirated 673 at some point. It does not run yet, but it turns over. All 3 H613's were bought by Ralph Smith. The other 2 were wrecked in accidents. They were made in 1956 from left over parts. Ralph Smith had 7 H61's already and wanted these to match to Mack made them for him. Mine is kind of rough, but it still exists. I'd like to know how many H61's are around. I know a guy down in the Carolina's has two or three, but don't know of any others. Michael Yarnall
  50. 1 point

    From the album: BULLDOG MACK

    I FOUND THIS TRUCK AT truckpaper.com and if a new job works out I want one just like her except with ALL Mack drive line
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