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  1. I've heard multiple people attempt to blame others...from the props department to the weapons specialist to any number of others involved in the process. Bottom line, though, this rests 100% with Mr. Baldwin. HE was the one who picked up the gun. HE was the one who did not verify it's condition. HE was the one who pointed it in an unsafe direction. HE was the one who squeezed the trigger. Sure, there were others involved with the loading, etc. of the gun...but all of those people and what they may or may not have done wrong to possibly contribute to this tragedy would be a non-issue had Mr. Baldwin simply followed the most basic rules of safe firearm handling.
    9 points
  2. About 16 years ago I sold my B and my H. Been looking around for a single axle, day cab, naturally asperated, cabover (that's all I have room for in the barn) as a winter project. Doug Fetterly turned me on to a G in Virginia. The owner passed away and Scotty Shifflet and Ken Sage were handling his estate. Was able to strike a deal and hauled this beauty back home to the Buckeye. 1962 G75LT END 673 with a triplex (aluminum case). The cab is aluminum also. There was no accompanying paperwork to document its restoration or who did it. The truck was sold to the deceased Va. gentleman by Ken Crouse of Iowa who got it from Bill Smith of Fort Dodge Iowa who supposedly purchased it out of Michigan in restored condition. Does anybody recognize this truck and could provide me with further info as to its history? Haven't driven it yet as the radiator needs to be re-cored so that will be the first order of business. Thx Dennis
    8 points
  3. There are people rotting away in prison who "didn't know it was loaded" and "accidently" killed someone. I really don't see how this is any different.
    6 points
  4. I posted incomplete photos of my DMM build in the introduction forum. Here it is fully outfitted for work. This project has taken a little over a year for me to fab and assemble. That stainless tank is 6000 USG which equates to a payload of approximately 27 tons of cattle manure. With an Eaton hydrostatic drive off the crank like a cement truck, I can unload in slightly over 2 minutes, with no stopping necessary to engage or disengage an air shift PTO. I am still in the market for bigger/more tires. Got stuck pretty nicely this weekend. But it looks like my options are pretty limited as long as I have the Dana hubs.... Anyone with suggestions please chime in. Also does Anyone know the approx tare wt of a bare DMM? I haven't gotten around to taking it over the scales.... I know we have hills that I can't make it up any faster than 23Mph. The EM6-275 is working pretty hard 😅( I may have "adjusted" the fuel plate) but it is still better than pulling that amount with a farm tractor. received_864841447552775.mp4
    5 points
  5. I will not miss him at all if he goes to prison for any reason.
    5 points
  6. 5 points
  7. Is this gun loaded?? YES!! Thats what I was taught before I even joined the Army... It used to be standard lesson's from Dad... and these ACTORS are just that...Actors.. Too bad that Lady lost her life due to a lack of training... jojo
    5 points
  8. All three of my children was taught by me and they still remember that there is no empty gun.And never point it at anything that you would not want to shoot.
    5 points
  9. Yep!!! You reckon, if I put masks on all of my guns it will be the cure for lead poisoning?
    5 points
  10. I forwarded the pics & post to Mike last night. This was his response: "Im pretty sure Bill Smith did the restoration, there was a very similar truck that was owned and restored by Tom Pierce from MI,but I really don't think this is it,but I could be wrong. Bill Smith's collection had been sold off for 10 years or so,when this G75 and a restored KW were found hidden in a terminal building. Ken Crouse and his now late brother George,bought them,and Ken resold this one,his brother donated the KW along with some of his other trucks to ATHS in his will." Mike's health still has him down somewhat but his spirits are good. He no longer has an actual computer so he doesn't get on this site much at all as he cannot log onto here with his tablet. He does post on several Mack & ATHS related FB pages however. On FB he is Mike Harbison Sr as Mikey is also on FB as Mike Harbison. If a Mack has ever landed in Iowa there is a good chance that the Mike's know something about i!
    5 points
  11. I was driving along a back road minding my own business a few weeks ago when I spotted a Ford F150 sitting in a yard with a "for sale" sign in the windshield. I've been wanting a pickup for a while, but I thought back to the last time I saw a pickup for sale by the road... It was a nice looking short bed 4wd Dodge, so I went back to take a closer look. Everybody has a short bed square body Chevrolet pickup, but nobody has a Dodge. So I ended up buying that Dodge, paid way too much for it, but I had big plans for it- I was going to get it painted, put some mud tires on it, it would be sharp, or so I thought. Actually all it ended up being was a money pit, never could get it running like it was supposed to. It ran great when it ran, but it would just die periodically, and you never knew when it was going to quit. Might run 2 weeks without a hitch, or it might start acting up before I got out of the driveway. So after spending a small fortune on it and replacing everything I could think of, and taking it to every garage and shop from Appomattox to Concord to Gladys and having them do everything they could think of, with the same results, I got tired of throwing money away on it and sold it- for a lot less than I paid for it. So when I saw this Ford I kept right on riding, never even slowed down. But as I was riding along in Rustburg one day I thought i'd go take a look at it, it was only a mile or so down to it after you turned by the store on the corner. I must have looked too long, because Zina from Gladys got out of the car and came over to look too. What had caught my attention was the price- $1,800. It was the first time i'd seen what appeared to be a reasonably priced pickup for a long time. The owner was there and he came over to start it for me, but it wouldn't start. The right front tire was low too- reminded me of the old Dodge! Anyway, he said he would put a new battery in it if I wanted to come back and drive it. He called the next day and said he put a brand new battery in it so I went back to Rustburg and took it for a test drive. It ran ok except it idled a bit fast, but it had about a quarter turn of play in the steering wheel. I got Zina from Gladys to turn the wheel while I looked under the front end and the center drag link was obviously loose, it had a lot of play in it. And the tires were all low, that right front only had 20 lbs. in it. And a U-joint was "ticking" when you would go from 1st. to reverse, and I found the rear joint was bad when I would hit it with my hands. So here's an actual photo of me and Pammeler Anderson that was taken the last time I was in sunny Florida, to relieve the boredom of a long post. But the truck had nice looking tires on it, so I bought it. The guy I bought it from said he only used it for hunting, he probably didn't even notice the play in the steering. I took it straight to a garage in Concord and told them to go over it with a fine tooth comb, and evidently they did. It needs all these items- I was just going to patch the rust holes in the floorboard, but I went ahead and ordered patch panels yesterday. It has the 300 6 cylinder in it and a 4 speed, and even after the parts and work I still have less in it than I paid for that POS Dodge.
    4 points
  12. I declare that I am no fan of Baldwin. Today in our local paper full 2 pages on this very sad and completely preventable tragedy. These are some excepts from our newspaper. James Gunn US film director - the rules were changed after Brandon Lee died ... but more rules will not help if the rules aren't followed, which is usually how accidents happen on set. Producers etc need to be hardcore about making sure all the safety protocols are followed at all times. Guilaume Delouche - Hollywood armourer who has supplied weapons to filmmakers for 30 + years. Protocols are necessarily strict comparing the double and triple checks with the way areoplane saftey systems operate. Blank weapons are treated as if they were real weapons. Once they on the set we organise the blank ammunition which is marked and coloured coded. First we show the crew and actors that the gun is empty before loading it, when we put blanks in it we announce it, several times. We have strict safety distances, you can't have someone less than 20 feet (6m) in front of a weapon when it is fired. It is better to never aim at someone directly. If we need to be closer we put up Plexiglass walls and cover the operators etc with fire blankets, anti noise helmets and safety glasses. If a blank is put in behind a dummy it effectively becomes a live round. That is what cost Brandon Lee's his life, there was never a check by the prop maker, which would have prevented the accident. I think these comments indicate that Baldwin, the person in charge- THE BOSS, did not do his job, based on what has been reported he did not follow the rules and protocols. If he made sure the protocols were strictly followed possibility of an accident was NIL. Will he be held accountable the same way a transport boss would be treated if a truck has accident, people die because protocols were not followed?
    4 points
  13. Sound Like it really was the Wild West.. There's few things about this that Don't pass the Smell Test to Me.. I just Hope that the Truth Comes out & Justice prevails..
    4 points
  14. by the end of the night it will be all the guns fault, and there will be fresh rounds of all guns must be banned.
    4 points
  15. Supply Chain. The President stated that we should not worry about supply chain problems and back up's. He is going to give the nations transport companies permission to run the trucks at night ! I am going out right now to purchase some railroad lanterns so i will be ready. I wonder if he will let the airplanes fly at night also ???
    4 points
  16. Don't have any handy of just the trailer. When I got it it was a run hard oil field work trailer. I put new side rails and cross members, brakes, lights and paint. I also rebushed the entire suspension (Hyster was gone by then Etnyre still provided the bushings). 8/4" white oak for the deck. It has a Braden winch (20,000 slp), 90' of 5/8 cable, mounted on the head end of the trailer. Hydraulic driven off the B75 wet line. It still shows battle scars from days in the patch. Here is a picture behind the B75 with the Sixty Caterpillar on board.
    4 points
  17. Sad news of 1 dead and 1 critical. How could he be holding and firing a live loaded gun on a film set in 2021, with all the industry safety procedures? I read he is the producer, so he is in ultimate control and should be accountable! He ridiculed the President with joy for what, 3 years weekly on TV, what will be said of Baldwin now? Where does the buck stop here?
    3 points
  18. Tracked this truck back to Tom Pierce and his restoration shop in Blissfield, Michigan. He purchased it around 1992, restored it, painted it in Norwalk Truck Lines livery and took it to the 1994 ATHS show in Buffalo. I was there with my 36 Dodge LE32 but don't really remember it. It was sold in his auction to Bill Smith in 1994. Will be inquiring of the Mack Museum for the build sheet and who it was originally sold to.
    3 points
  19. A big problem back years ago with turbos was That they were run too hot on the exhaust side cooking them.Older engines did not have a fuel ratio valve and if the turbo lost boost for some reason due to aleak the fuel would keep fuel at max setting causing hi exhast temps.The newer engine have a fuel ratio valve or boost sensor that will limit the fuel to the engine if the boost is not high enough so the turbo is saved the high temp.
    3 points
  20. Last picture is whatever used to be fuel that I got it running on. The worst rust of all is shown in the back of cab pic. Found an inspection receipt from 2005 in the truck and its less than 700 miles from the current mileage. All documents and tags I've found expired in '07
    3 points
  21. You're welcome. The battery powered cucumber ? I think they're supposed to help with the climate crisis ??? There's lots of talk about battery power for that.....
    3 points
  22. gr8 pix Udder Dog the Gal with the cucumber may B ask n where the batteries go LOL cya
    3 points
  23. I had been to that issue just a couple months back. Was bringing to life a DM of 1987. Also had idea to try getting it road worthy where it was parked to drive home by its own. Had to get rid of such plan after observed the truck in person and towed it. Time showed out it was right way to go. The first thing I noted disliking was short move of the governor lever where the starting control cable attaches. Tried to set the tension of the cable but still was doubtful on the correctness. After priming with fresh fuel and a few dosen of either I got the engine fired up and running with a few missings. My next step was a try to stop it by the lever and no luck with. I did what you did and had it stopped. After spinning the facts in my mind for a bit I figured there must be a plunger stuck not the rack itself. Or multiple plungers. So I released the injection lines at the pump sections and asked a helper to crank the engine with a starter. Fuel appeared from 4 fittings but #1 and #4 didn't show evidence of pressure in the lines. I opened the top cover on the governor and could get to some bracket that was attached to something that looked like an end of the rack. Tried to pry and hit with no luck. I had an old spare Robert Bosch pump on a shelf which I looked over and figured not easy to get inside of. Decided I could direct access a plunger if I remove the delivery valve holder (top fitting on the pump) and the valve. I have done it in the past to set the injection point and could see the plunger top looking into the hole. I needed a multi edged socket to get the holders off which I didn't have. Tried it barbarian way with long arm pliers but only had edges smashed, the fittings were set damn tight. I investigated the net and found out there were only 2 sizes of sockets for Bosch pumps and trucks used larger one. Bosch # was 0 986 611 274 which I crossed to CT-N724 some aftermarket tool. I got lucky purchasing the latter locally. It must have 34 edges and the smaller socket (for cars) has 32 (or 33?) Ok, washed clearly the surround of the delivery valve housing (the pump was still on the engine), drove it off and removed. Put in a pre-washed can I prepped for. Took the spring and than the valve stem and its seat off with tweezers (don't touch with fingers) and put into the same can and closed it. If you would happen to do the job use separate can for each valve not mixing parts of different sections. Sprayed a bit of diesel fuel into the hole using syringe. After I took a small brass stick (nearly 5mm OD and 50mm long), put it into the hole and managed its end onto the top of the plunger. Hit the stick end with a small hammer (washed its head prior for not dropping dirf off it). Could move the plunger down a little bit but not much. Put more diesel on it and asked a helper to turn the crank shaft by a socket tool until I saw the plunger went back up (and stuck there again). I tried to hit the plunger top more but couldn't get it free and had almost no luck with the other stuck one. So we removed the pump from the engine and put in a vise. After the supply pump was removed and I looked into the hole to see the cam shaft I found out its cams were made different than a common cam should look. I expected the cam to be high along nearly 1/4 of the shaft circle (like an engine cam shaft looks and those in injection pumps I saw before). But the one in Robert Bosch pump was made having 3/4 of its circle high and only 1/4 low where a plunger is able to go down. So turned out I tried to move the plunger when it was supported by the cam on the shaft. If I knew that I suppose I could make it free with the pump still on the engine. Ok, with the pump in a vise I hitted/elevated the plunger 3-4 times spilling diesel onto and got it travelling free. But that was the #4. The #1 didn't go even by the hammer. So I had to go harder way. First I approached it on the spare pump and seeing the desingn got back to the patient. The matter is the housing the delivery valve housing attaches to is a plunger barrel itself. It is fitted into the main pump aluminium housing and clamped by two nuts. Each barrel has 2 nuts so you see 6 pairs of clamping nuts at the top of the pump. If you remove the nuts you cam turn the barrel housing in the pump body and over the plunger at the same time. Turning it over and prying up at the same time you can pull it off. The plunger would stay in place than. But the issue is turning the barrel you change the point the plunger cuts off the supply hole in the barrel what means the beginning of injection. So if you fit the barrel back different you would change the stroke supply amount of the spoken section. In my case I didn't have plans for seriouse use of the truck in the distant future and could bring the pump to a shop for calibration later. So I scratched a mark both on the barrel housing side and the pump aluminium housing, removed the nuts and turned the barrel in the housing hitting it to the "ear" the mounting stud goes through. It first turned together with the plunger but after I both turned and pryed up with a screwdriver the plunger got its own movement. Adding diesel drops and hits upon the plunger top with the brass stick I finally got it free. Pressed down the barrel housing back to its place and aligned my marks. Having a bit of experience with calibrating pumps I suppose I wouldn't need to put the particular one on a bench if going to use the truck for a hobby after what I did to it. Everyday work is sure another story. But that second part of my tale is a really hard case. The truck was parked for no less than 5 or 6 years and as I could see it operated with no fuel filters at all (!!!) before got parked. So my guess you may be "lucky" following the 1st half of the story scenario. Vlad
    3 points
  24. Here's a link to the pictures I took in Colfax-
    3 points
  25. Last batch of brackets and straps. All thats left is the hood, fenders, fender extensions and headlight panels for paint. I was going to do some major assembly of the truck this fall, but the front brake parts are holding me up. The plan now is to wait until spring to do it as I don't want my cab sitting out under cover until then. Plenty to keep me busy over the Winter. I dragged the three piece drive shaft home to see if it was of use. I think by swapping the first two sections and then having the rear section shortened it is useable. I would then just need to fabricate the hanger bearing supports for it. That may save me a lot of time and money instead of having the whole thing fabricated.
    3 points
  26. I guess I do, but I got over-excited when I found a truck I could actually afford- but, the mechanic at the garage didn't see it until it was on the lift and he started working on it. And the dang thing had a good inspection sticker on it, that kind of pisses me off the most. I told the guy I bought it from about it and sent him pictures, and he apologised and said he didn't know. And I believe him. But whoever inspected it for him, that's a different story. All that didn't happen since the last inspection, somebody just slapped a sticker on it and collected their $20 and didn't inspect $#it. It's good to know somebody like that sometimes, I might have done some sketchy things to get a sticker before, like using a beer can and two hose clamps to hide an exhaust leak or something, but this is too much, it's ridiculous really. But i'm not going back on anybody to get them in trouble, and I should have looked closer. I probably would have still bought the truck, but at least I would have known what I needed to do and I probably could have gotten it a little cheaper. And, on the bright side, I have located about everything I need to fix it. Then I saw this girl in the produce section at the Winfall Winn-Dixie on the way home. She said ''excuse me, is this a cucumber or a zuccini"? I said ''how should I know, do I look like a botanist or whatever you call it to you''? She just stared at me and I continued on to the beer section. Seemed suspicious to me, I think she knew exactly what it was.
    3 points
  27. McGrath is or should I say was an Australian brand of trailer, very well regarded in the transport industry and still a lot running alobg the hwys even though it's well over 30 years since they made them Heres a tale of one of mine Paul
    3 points
  28. Went down to the truck yesterday afternoon. Spent 2 hours on it before dark. Minus the time getting bothered by the locals. An elderly gentleman walking his dogs asked if it was going to run after sitting there forever. 2 minutes later a neighbor drove up barking "who said you could work on this truck here!" It only took a minute to tell him the name of the cider mill owner that I'd bought it from to calm him down. Not 2 minutes later the town supervisor even drove up asking what was going on. It was actually a good feeling to know that after working on a truck 5 minutes that many locals showed concern to making sure I wasn't stealing parts or the whole truck. They were glad to see it was leaving after being a community landmark for so long. Found the right fuel cap center vent had rotted away allowing moisture in the tank. Had to hammer the cap loose and whatever was inside that used to be fuel wasn't pretty. Half tank of... Something. Twisted and crushed crossover valve trying to shut it. Cut the crossover tube and drained it until something resembling fuel came out. Kinked that over to stop flow. Dropped in a pair of new batteries and cab relay powered up immediately. Checked air intake for debris and turbo for freeness. Popped off primary to see it was still full but certainly needed to be replaced. Tried to get greedy and leave the secondary alone but that bit me in the ass. Never understood the superliner secondary location. Put a pressure gauge on the oil line cut when the gauge panel was stolen. Cranked for 20 seconds with shutoff pulled to pump some oil. Starter cranks fast but sounds sickly. Got it to fire a little on ether before seeing the fuel running out of the rotten secondary. Broke the handle completely off my filter wrench, got drenched with fuel trying to break filter free from underneath with a screwdriver driven through. Ended up taking filter base completely off and spent 15 minutes chiseling the filter off on the ground. After reassembly it only took a couple more minutes to get it running, but found pump plunger hanging up. Had a gusher from the short return tube around front of pump. Cobbed up with vent tube from hydraulic tank. Running consistently with horrible governor response but only a minor misfire. 10 minutes running time I kinked off the cut heater control air line on the stolen heater box, built full air pressure. Oil psi 60-80. As the rpms climbed to 1800 and stayed I tried to work it back down until I found return line from head leaking. Fuel shutoff lever no longer responding. I removed supply line directly from injection pump to kill it. Aired flat left steer tire half way with gladhand hose. Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to see if the clutch is stuck. This morning I'll head back down with the lowboy and hopefully I can keep it down near an idle to load it after I put new return line on it. So maybe I'll start a new post. I've had good luck with a stuck plunger on an ambac after using biofuel and sitting, It freed up well. How about this Robert Bosch? Will a sticky plunger keep the shutoff lever from operating? Once I get it home maybe I'll need some advice on freeing the plunger on a Robert Bosch.
    3 points
  29. I took some pictures though, I'll post them when I get home.
    3 points
  30. i have been on both sides of this coin. currently have 2 B models for sale un upstate ny that are very nice trucks and all i get is tire kickers or guys that want a million pics, ask a million questions then give me the run around or ill get the '' boy this comes at a bad financial time for me'' lots of dreamers out there.... on the buying and sellin end. EVERYONE wants a B model til its time to actually open their wallet and buy one or they want a perfectly runnin driving half restored truck for 5 grand. then you get the dreamers who sit on stuff and never do anything with it and let it rot. end of rant haha
    3 points
  31. Holy Crap... I don't get it... I learned about muzzle energy and pressure when I was in basic training for the Army. Heck we trained with blast deflectors clamped to the muzzles, and the gas pressure would operate the bolt so that another round would load.. Anyway, I'm no expert, just posting comments... Jojo
    3 points
  32. This happened about 30 years ago on a set for an American T.V. series.. The actor played a character who was a weapons specialist. the gun was loaded with blanks, just like Alec's. Unfortunately these Dummies did'nt know that the pressure coming out of the muzzle can kill you if the weapon is pointed at you in very close range. The first one years ago, He put the gun to his head and fired it. It blew a chunk of his skull into his brain. Alec, fired the gun towards the director and was close enough to cause a similar, fatal injury. Of course this is about Alec Baldwin, so here in the States, they protect Psycho Lib's.. I'm sure there is another angle to what happened and it's on the cutting room floor. Jojo
    3 points
  33. To a Yankee, that's just a repair that needs to get done.... sometime... jojo (yankee)
    3 points
  34. And this is why the covid death numbers in the US are so high! We have been lied to from the beginning!
    3 points
  35. Mr Buck First determine what seats you have, National Standard, Bostrom, or whatever Then go online and see what replacement parts are available?? Find out how the roller bracket is mounted above your shoulder and check with Barry at Watts Mack, this website's owner, and see what he can come up with???? Barry has probably done this before!!!
    3 points
  36. Went down to Jersey and took care of the humdrum payment and paperwork crap this afternoon so its a done deal. Got a photo circa 1996 back when she was pretty and the storage tanks were installed at the cider mill. Funny thing, 2 weeks ago when I drove past to see if this truck was still there on my way home from Gerhart's, the tanks had just been removed and were Tennessee bound. That was the first I ever found people around there to set this deal in motion.
    3 points
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