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  1. Commercial Truck.jpg
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    When most people think of the most hazardous occupation in America, few people consider that driving a commercial truck would be near the top of the list. But, annual safety statistics clearly identify that individuals working within the transportation industry have the second highest level of job-related fatalities, averaging over 900 deaths per year. The only occupation that experiences a higher injury and fatality rate in America is the construction industry, averaging over 1,100 worker deaths per year.

    It is a sobering statistic when you consider how many commercial truck drivers there are on the road.  In the United States, there is an estimated 3.5 million licensed commercial truck drivers in the private sector.  Of the 15.5 million registered commercial trucks on the road, two million are tractor trailers.

    Despite the fact that statistics indicate a decline in fatalities and injuries in the commercial truck industry, truck driving remains a hazardous occupation that contributes to loss and injury on an annual basis.  We will discuss the laws and technology that are helping to tighten loopholes in policy and procedure, and the culture and compensation models that need to change to improve road safety.

    Accident Data for the American Commercial Trucking Industry

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration combines data for tractor trailers, or 18-wheel logistic delivery, with passenger bus data for an overview of commercial large vehicle accident statistics. The most recent reports from the FMCSA are available to the public, and compiles national accident data.

    In the "Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts" report (2014), the following accident statistics were shared, including:

    • A five percent decrease in overall commercial truck and bus accidents was noted in 2014.
    • A commercial bus/transport truck driver fatality rate of 3,744.
    • An increase to the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) of 1.5 percent.
    • A decrease in the number of injury crashes involving truck drivers (2009 to 2014) of 37 percent.

    There are many factors that contribute to an increased injury and fatality rate for commercial drivers. The U.S. Department of Transportation estimated (based on one independent study) that there were 120,000 fatal and injury-causing crashes that involved at least one transport truck in a 33-month review period.  

    The report cites six different factors that contribute to truck-driver fatalities and injuries in the United States. The first factor, which was estimated to contribute to more than 38 percent of commercial truck accidents was related to driver decision making. The second factor was recognition, which accounted for 28 percent of injuries, and relates to distracted driving incidents, including use of smartphone or tablet while driving, or other distractions inside our external to the truck.

    Non-performance was related to 12 percent of truck-driver fatalities and accidents, which includes physical emergencies (heart attack, stroke, or seizure) and falling asleep while driving. It is that statistic that has many within the industry defending that restrictions to driving time should be reduced.  However, both decision-making and distraction levels can be significantly impacted by driver fatigue, along with slower reflexes, cognitive functioning, and alertness. Environmental causes (weather and road conditions) accounted for only two percent of accidents and fatalities in the study.

    Identifying the Cause of Commercial Truck Accidents

    Since the 1930s, professional truck drivers have been required by law to maintain a logbook of destinations, miles traveled and rest breaks. In the United States, for every twelve hours that a commercial truck driver is on the road, he or she is required to take ten hours of time off to rest, relax, and recharge before continuing on long haul journeys.

    The problem with the paper method of tracking for inspectors has been historically well-known. Many truckers have opted to keep two separate paper logs (books) – one for inspectors, which comply with the safety and rest break regulations, and one for the owner/operator or trucking company, which logs actual time and miles traveled. The log can also be used as legal evidence in tractor trailer accident investigations.

    New legislation announced in 2016 will move to shorten how long drivers can legally operate transport trucks in service for commercial delivery. The Owner-Operator Independent Driver’s Association (OOID) sued the Safety Administration in an attempt to block the new laws, citing that requiring truckers to invest in unproven technology was unfair. The OOID also stated that its members felt that the new mandatory electronic log system (ELD) was no more effective than the traditional, paper method. This stance would protect the rights of truckers to falsify their travel logs, and potentially increase the number of fatigued drivers on the road, and the national fatality and injury rates for commercial drivers and general road safety.

    Employment and Compensation Structures for Drivers

    As truckers are paid by the mile, there is a tremendous personal incentive for them to deliver the shipment in the shortest amount of time possible. For long-haul drivers, the faster they deliver, the more quickly they are able to be assigned the next load. It has allowed drivers to optimize their earnings, while packing what many experts believe to be a highly fatigue-driven work week that can exceed one hundred (100) hours or more on the road.

    While it is illegal for delivery companies to offer a "fast delivery" incentive to drivers, within the industry, this kind of bonus structure is "off record" and common.  If given the opportunity to drive "double shifts" and past the legal requirement and earn a bonus, few commercial truck drivers would decline the chance to earn more, which is why incentives that circumvent existing distance and hour limitations are illegal.  They remain a strong part of the industry culture, however, and are confidential transactions between employers and drivers.

    While legal requirements create safer roads for both commercial drivers and other motor vehicles, continuing education and support from within the industry to change the business culture and the compensation model for commercial drivers must also change. This is already starting to happen from within the industry, through various organizations like the American Trucking Association, with the goal of making a long-term career in the transport industry safer.

  2. Bair84

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    Bair84
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    i have had a problem with the E6, from the dealership this motor has skipped on start up and smokes blue, it has the american pump on it, the dealership tells me it is an 18degree pump. in a pull this thing only runs like 725-750 on the pyro. any input on this serious skip would be much appreciated.

  3. Eight Safety Tips for Truck Drivers.jpg

    The American trucking business is a multi-million dollar industry. According to the American Trucking Association, trucking collected $726.4 billion in gross freight revenues, which makes 81.5 percent of the nation's freight bill in 2015.

    Unfortunately, thousands of trucking accidents take place in the United States every year. According to a report published by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, an estimated 342,000 large trucks were involved in road crashes in 2013, killing 3,964 and injuring almost 95,000 people. When in an accident, trucks usually cause huge property damage and serious injuries due to their massive size.

    Driving a big rig requires a great deal of skill. It also involves a huge responsibility for the safety of others as well as the truck driver. Here are eight safety tips for big rig drivers that can keep you safe on the road:

    1. Be Aware of Your Truck's Blind Spots

    Truck drivers' blind spots are areas around the truck where the driver does not have a clear view of nearby objects. Although truck drivers are higher off the ground, they still have serious blind spots. These blind spot areas include the side directly in front of the cab, area right behind the truck, and along each side, especially on the right side.

    Most car and bike drivers are not aware of these blind spots, which can be quite frustrating for truck drivers. Unfortunately, there is nothing a trucker can do if the other driver stays in his/her blind spot. So, other drivers on the road should stay out of these blind spots to avoid a fatal collision. Nonetheless, truck drivers should also take precaution when changing lanes and taking a turn.

    2. Plan Your Trip in Advance

    Knowing the terrain, traffic, and weather conditions along your route can help you plan your trip well in advance. When planning your trip, make sure to avoid routes with a higher likelihood of accidents. In short, you should avoid hilly or mountainous terrains and roads with frequent stop signs, where you may have to face long lines of impatient drivers. Avoid driving at peak hours. More traffic means higher chances of an accident.   

    Bad weather is arguably the biggest safety threat to a trucker. Make sure to check the latest weather reports before starting your trip. If necessary, check the reports as frequently as you can when traveling. There are numerous weather websites as well as mobile apps offering regular updates of local weather conditions. You should also be aware of weight restrictions on bridges and height clearances under bridges and through the tunnels on your route.

    3. Perform Pre-Trip Inspections

    Drivers are supposed to conduct a thorough check of their truck, trailer, and the load before starting a long haul. Nonetheless, a pre-trip inspection, even for a short trip, is necessary for your safety. Check for oil or coolant leaks running down the side of the engine. Carefully inspect shock absorbers, ball joints, and kingpins for wear and proper lubrication.

    Circle-check the vehicle to make sure all lights on the truck and trailer are working properly. Look over the entire vehicle for body damage. Make sure that vital parts such as engine, electric system, wipers, steering wheel, brakes, tire pressure, landing gear, and crank handle, among others, are functioning properly. Carry out repairs immediately. Click here to read about the most commonly overlooked pre-trip inspections.

    4. Avoid Improper Loading

    The importance of avoiding improper loading can't be stressed enough. It is the leading cause of truck accidents. Improper loading can cause a truck to tip over, especially around sharp turns and curves. It can also lead to a mechanical failure, bringing the truck to an abrupt halt.

    The heavy load can also fall off the truck on the road, resulting in an accident. This is particularly dangerous if the truck is carrying hazardous cargo such as chemicals, metals, and highly inflammable products.

    5. Change Lanes as Infrequently as Possible

    Changing lanes too frequently can increase the chances of an accident. When changing lanes, move over slowly and carefully. Make sure to check your mirrors and blind spots to avoid a potentially dangerous situation. Avoid changing lanes around curves or turns and during heavy traffic.

    The legal and financial consequences of a truck accident can be devastating. If you are in a truck accident, contact a local lawyer specializing in truck accident law as soon as possible. For example, if the accident took place in Albany, you should contact a Georgia truck injury attorney immediately to seek proper legal advice.

    6. Avoid Drowsy Driving

    It is better to pull over and take a nap if you are feeling tired. Driver fatigue is a major cause of truck accidents. The bottom-line is that your drowsiness can contribute to an accident. So, make sure to get a good night's sleep before going for a long haul. You should also take regular breaks during the trip. In fact, according to the new hours-of-service safety regulations, truck drivers are required to take a 30-minute break during the first eight hours of a shift.

    7. Drive Cautiously around Curves

    Truck drivers should remember to slow down around curves and turns. A truck can easily tip over when taking a turn without maintaining a proper speed. Speed limits posted on curves and ramps are mostly meant for cars and light vehicles, certainly not for trucks. So, make sure to drive slower than the recommended speed limit. Drive with extra care at night, especially in tight maneuvering situations.

    8. Use a Trucker's GPS

    Compared to car drivers, truckers have to face several driving challenges such as height, weight, and hazardous cargo restrictions, etc. Relying on a personal GPS can be potentially dangerous for truck drivers. A personal GPS will choose the shortest route without identifying truck-restricted roads. A trucker's GPS, on the other hand, can provide a comprehensive analysis of your route with detailed truck-specific mapping data.

    Sadly, truck accidents are a common occurrence in the United States. Because of the massive size of the commercial vehicles, truck accidents can be much more devastating than normal car crashes. A truck accident usually involves fatalities, severe injuries, traffic jams for long hours, and thousands of dollars in property damage. Big rig drivers are skilled and patient, but still are required to exercise extra precaution to avoid potentially dangerous collisions. These eight safety tips can keep truck drivers, as well as others, safe on the road.

     

    (Image Source)

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    Pete Rizzo
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    Hey guys, coming down the home stretch on my B project but still need a few odds and ends.

    wonder if anyone can help. i'm looking for a set of lenses and trim rings for the map lights

    above the driver and passenger doors. also the plates that go on the dash which read dry

    road/slippery road and tractor protection. i would also like to find a decent steering wheel,

    at least one better than the one I have. any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks

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    Does anyone have any tips for adjust the door latch so it holds closed. The door will catch on the first cog but won't stay in the closed position.

    Thanks!

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    E7-350  set flywheel position timed pump put together light says its  good(a&b lit up) wont start without ether. when letting off throttle it stalls out . pushes out  a TON of smoke??? any ideas? i still think timing is off

  4. GLB

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    Recently bought an 04' Mack Vision.  Runs great when it's empty but when the trailer is loaded ( I haul steel coils) it loses power and shakes something fierce once I get around 60 mph.  Any suggestions?

  5. B Lane

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    Does any one here own a 1987-1990 Mack Superliner e9 v8 with a tall window sleeper cab and or have detailed pics of the truck?

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    I just purchased a 1992 CH 613 with a E7 300 .... not running ..
     I did after a day of checking I found the fuel  pickup  inside the fuel tank was plugged .
     blew it clear and primed the pump and she started right up ...
     but, now after 10-15 seconds I have no throttle response ? and a Electronic malfunction light . after reading other blogs in this sight found out how to get the fault codes !

    with two faults ,,, one 3-4 telling me " engine position sensor ... I adjusted the sensor on the Pump and this corrected that fault . the other fault is a 4-2 " fan clutch output " can anyone help me with this ?  Jaan

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    Has anyone fitted a exhaust brake to a mack e9 and use the dynotard at the same time

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    Bair84
    Latest Entry

    so i recently purchased a ReMack E6 4valve engine,they used my pump and all externals, i ran this engine 36,193 miles, brought it into my local Mack dealer and when the engine was torn apart they found 4 broken and scarred to hell pistons and liners, i mean honestly at this 36k on the motor, are there defects in the material they are using in the piston and liner department?? any answers or input on this situation would be much appreciated by myself and my 89 superliner with 2.3 mill on her !!!! my email is also bandbtrucking89@gmail.com. thank you

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    dennishutto51
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    does anyone know where to find the plastic "feet" that the shutter paines fit on for a 75 R model? They fit into the steel brackets and allow the shutters to open or close.

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    I have a 96 ch 613 with an e7 350 , it has been giving me problems with the coolant pushing out of the surge tank and running the top tank down to the sensor level ... it has not been running hot , temp stays around 190 on the gauge without much fluctuation , it does not do this consistently however mostly when under a load .... any information on possible causes for this would be greatly appreciated. thanks in advance

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    Just purchased a 1961 B61 10 wheel dump. 20 sp, I think 711, Runs like a Swiss watch. Other than the junk rubber shaking you out of the drives seat, she drove home wonderful. I'm looking for a few things. The rubber 10x20 tube type needs to be addressed.
    Also looking for steering wheel and hood chrome. Last but not least, The truck is worth a full paint, The triple frame and dump have been sandblasted. Dropping the oil and coolant, Jim From Bethany CT

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    I am performing a parked regen on a 2012 CXU613 MP8 and it will only get up to 600 degrees exhaust temp. it will sit for over an hour and still not a complete regen.No regen codes are displayed. doser module seems to be working. any advise is appreciated.

  6. gry's Blog

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    Hey Mack people,I have a 2005 Granite CV713 we flopped this Fall and looking to replace the cab,I can find all kinds of Vision cabs the same era,will the Vison cab interchange with the Granite or are they totally different as far as mounts and firewall openings,any help would be greatly appreciated,Greg

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    Biznill187
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    Hey guys! New to the site. I'm having a problem with extended crank on a 2008 MP7. So far i have replaced the overflow valve. Both filter and separator. Any suggestions would be huge thanks anyone!

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    looking for an air throttle valve for a 1990 mack rd688sx dump truck.
    or any info on how to repair one that does not hold air.
    please email directly to rollon55@yahoo.com

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    When i sit and turn the wheel easy its ok but when i try to turn the wheel quick it sticks new king pins and boxes and shaft jointsand oil help me

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    Having an issue with my 427 after dealer installed new exhaust studs. The first time they started it, it blew an injector. They rebuilt injector but it only lasted 3 hours. Replaced injector, no power and engine sputtering.replaced all 6 injectors, no difference. Then dealer decided computer has gotten antifreeze in it from coolant sensor so they replaced harness and ecu. No difference. Got a super hot program from mack which actually helped a little, but still no power and low rpms (1200 to 1600). They checked epu's again and felt that #5 was bad so replaced it. Nada. Got 3 more data files from Mack..Nada. Mack said replace turbo. Made slightly more power but no fix. Truck tach actually goes backwards when taking off. Like the motor is surging. Now what?

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    lagriz
    Latest Entry

    I need parts for a D8F475 or DS8R40 mack scania engine

  7. We have a 1984 EM9 400hp, was wondering what its worth. Its in a cab over, runs good, fires right up, just don't need. We run a fleet of RD's running E6 and E7s

    Thanks
    Steve

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    I have an H 63 with duplex transmission. Would like to install a triplex but do not have the transmission mounted towers for a triplex install into a cab over. Does anyone have, or know where i might find these parts.

    Thanks for any assistance
    Regards Ken

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    blog-0797621001446090317.jpg

    I was wondering if I could get some advice. I just scanned my truck with our computer and I'm having a "VGT position sensor" coming up. Code 4-5. If anyone has some advice, please let me know. I'm looking to see if there is a way to maintain it without replacing the VGT. Any suggestions, please advise.